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Fundamental Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
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Chapter 21 / Exercise 21.5
Fundamental Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
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Volume 45 Number 2 | Journal of Research on Technology in Education | 107 Copyright © 2012, ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education), 800.336.5191 (U.S. & Canada) or 541.302.3777 (Int’l), [email protected], iste.org. All rights reserved. Brain Games as a Potential Nonpharmaceutical Alternative for the Treatment of ADHD JRTE | Vol. 45, No. 2, pp. 107–130 | ©2012 ISTE | iste.org/jrte Brain Games as a Potential Nonpharmaceutical Alternative for the Treatment of ADHD Stacy C . Wegrzyn Kennesaw State University Doug Hearrington Augusta State University Tim Martin and Adriane B . Randolph Kennesaw State University Abstract Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly di- agnosed childhood neurobehavioral disorder, affecting approximately 5.5 million children, of which approximately 66% take ADHD medication daily. This study investigated a potential nonpharmaceutical alternative to ad- dress the academic engagement of 5 th through 11 th grade students ( n = 10) diagnosed with ADHD. Participants were asked to play “brain games” for a minimum of 20 minutes each morning before school for 5 weeks. Engage- ment was measured at three points in time using electroencephalogram, par- ent and teacher reports, researcher observations, and participant self-reports. An analysis of the data supports the hypothesis that daily use of brain games can help strengthen focusing ability and executive functioning in adolescents with ADHD. The results provide hope for those searching for an alternative or supplement to medication as a means of helping students with ADHD engage in the classroom. (Keywords: ADHD, brain games, engagement, focus, execu- tive functioning, EEG) A ttention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed childhood neurobehavioral disorder, affecting approxi- mately 5.5 million children between the ages of 4 and 17 (CDC, 2010). Children with this disorder typically exhibit behaviors that are spurred by inattentiveness, hyperactivity, or a combination of both. Subtypes based on these characteristics are utilized in the diagnosis of those with ADHD. Although it is not considered a learning disability, the effects of ADHD can make learning more challenging for students (Samuels, 2005). As a result, approximately 66% of children diagnosed with ADHD take daily medication to treat the symptoms (CDC, 2010). Many of the medications available for the treatment of ADHD are of the stimulant variety. The theory behind these medications is that they adhere to important neurotransmitters, dopamine
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Fundamental Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 21 / Exercise 21.5
Fundamental Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
Howell
Expert Verified
108 | Journal of Research on Technology in Education | Volume 45 Number 2 Wegrzyn, Hearrington, Martin, & Randolph Copyright © 2012, ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education), 800.336.5191 (U.S. & Canada) or 541.302.3777 (Int’l), [email protected], iste.org. All rights reserved. and norepinephrine, which are typically in short supply in students with ADHD. The medications then activate these neurotransmitters to stimulate the prefrontal cortex (Szegedy-Maszak, 2002). There is abundant research supporting the theory that ADHD is caused by dysfunction in this part

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