Research Methods Chapter 5.pdf - CHAPTER 5 Finding the...

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CHAPTER 5Finding the Information You NeedDienebou Sacko, Network Administration and Security
75Here’s What We Know from Chapter 4How to use the ASA library catalog’s “Basic” and Advanced” searchfeatures to locate library holdingsHow to locate ASA library print sourcesHow to identify and use call numbers to find a bookHow to navigate the ASA library websiteHow to get face-to-face and virtual research assistanceBy The End Of This Chapter You Will Be Able To:Access, identify and locate ASA library databasesTell the difference between “general purpose” and “subject specific” databasesIdentify the similarities and differences between search engines and databasesDevelop keywords from your Semester Project thesis statementto use in database searchingIdentify and apply Boolean operators in database searching
76Search Engines and Catalogs and Databases: Oh My!You came to this class already knowing a good deal about using search engineslike Google to navigate the challenges of daily life. In Chapter 4, we explored using theASA library catalog, or OPAC, to find books and other holdings housed in the ASAphysical library to expand your information horizons.In this chapter, we add the third major component of information resources:librarydatabases.Databases: What They Are and What They Are NotFirst off, just what is a “library database”?Simply put, library databases arerepositories of digitized information, highly organized and available electronically bysubscription.What does this mean for you?Think of a database as a search engine’s older and more educated sibling, thebrother or sister who went to college and learned how to evaluate and organizeinformation. Where a search engine will provide you withallinformation available on theopen webthe good, the bad and everything in-between,a database is morediscriminating,drawing its information from a controlled number of resources that havebeen pre-screened and evaluated for you, so you don’t have to.
77Databases are also designed and maintained with theresearcherin mind. Whilethe initial learning curve is steeper than with a search engine like Google, the rewards arewell worth it. With some training and experience, you canfocus your search resultsona research topic much more specifically than you ever could with Google (think about it:when was the last time you did a Google search that returned less than severalmillionresults?). Database results are also typically ranked by either date (newest or oldest; youdecide), or “relevance” (which to a database means the number of times an articleincludes your search terms), whereas search engine results are ranked by popularity or“pay to play” (ranking positionpurchased by the source). Databases have numerous otherfilters, or “limiters,” as well, which allow you to fine-tune a search much more specificallythan with a search engine, be it to a specific date in time or a specific type of article.

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Term
Spring
Professor
Kilkeny
Tags
Web search engine, Google search

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