C361 Task 2.pdf - Running head HEALTHCARE PROBLEM Healthcare Problem C361 Task 2 Kelly Coelho Western Governors University 1 HEALTHCARE PROBLEM 2

C361 Task 2.pdf - Running head HEALTHCARE PROBLEM...

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Running head: HEALTHCARE PROBLEM 1 Healthcare Problem - C361 Task 2 Kelly Coelho Western Governors University
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HEALTHCARE PROBLEM 2 Healthcare Problem A1: Healthcare Problem CAUTI, or catheter-associated urinary tract infection, is a widespread problem across America’s health care settings. CAUTI can result from prolonged usage or improper care of an indwelling urinary catheter. A2: Significance of the Problem Although CAUTI has a lower morbidity and mortality rate in comparison to other hospital-acquired infections, the number of infections and deaths resulting from improper catheter usage remains large. CAUTIs account for 30% to 40% of hospital-acquired infections. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that over 13,000 deaths result from CAUTI each year, and that 9,000 of these deaths as well as 380,000 infections could be prevented each year if health care providers strictly followed infection control practices (Townsend, 2013). A3: Current Practice Because the main cause of CAUTIs is prolonged use of urinary catheters, indications are pointed at preventing prolonged or unnecessary insertion of urinary catheters. The CDC provides current practice guidelines for healthcare workers to follow regarding appropriate catheter use. The CDC’s guidelines include: only inserting a catheter when appropriately indicated, remove the catheter as soon as it is not needed any more, take extra caution and minimize use on high risk patients such as women, the elderly, and those with impaired immunity, avoid catheter usage to address urinary incontinence, only use catheters in operative patients when absolutely
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HEALTHCARE PROBLEM 3 necessary, and remove catheter from operative patients within 24 hours post op (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2009). In my practice, we strive to always follow these guidelines in order to prevent CAUTI in our patients. However, guidelines are not always followed in some healthcare settings. Sometimes patients will receive a catheter when not indicated - such as to control incontinence. Other times, catheter site care will be neglected, or the healthcare provider may forget or neglect to remove the catheter in a timely manner. A4: Organization Impact When a patient gets a CAUTI, this could potentially have a negative impact on the organization in several ways. First, the patient’s discharge time would be delayed. Also, a hospital-acquired infection would mean more of the organization’s resources would have to be expended in order to promote healing to the patient. Both of these factors would mean increased medical costs to the organization. If CAUTIs are a recurring problem at a hospital, especially if they are resulting in deaths, this would make the hospital unappealing for future prospective patients. If it is a hospital that is striving to achieve Magnet status, they likely will not earn this status if they are not appropriately addressing and reducing the rate of this problem.
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