hume_argument - Victoria Yakovleva Philosophy 101 Professor...

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Victoria Yakovleva Philosophy 101 Professor Shapiro 18 September 2006 In David Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, Part II , the characters of Demea, Philo, and Cleanthes discuss the nature of God. After Demea and Philo concur that the being of God is unquestionable, since nothing exists without a cause and the cause of the universe is God, they go on to state how the nature of God is “incomprehensible and unknown to us” because “our ideas reach no further than our experience” and “we have no experience of divine attributes and operations” (38 Hume). Upon hearing this, Cleanthes counters this point by discussing how God is in fact quite similar to the human mind. He states that the whole world is “one great machine, subdivided into an infinite number of lesser machines.” All of these machines in nature adapt means to ends, which parallels the adaptation of human design, thought, wisdom and intelligence. Through this parallel of the effects, Cleanthes infers that there must be a
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2008 for the course PHIL 101 taught by Professor Shapiro during the Fall '06 term at University of Wisconsin.

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hume_argument - Victoria Yakovleva Philosophy 101 Professor...

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