WK8AssgnYoungC.doc - 1 Gastrointestinal Disorders Christine Young Walden University NURS 6501N 43 Advanced Pathophysiology October 20th 2018 2

WK8AssgnYoungC.doc - 1 Gastrointestinal Disorders Christine...

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1 Gastrointestinal Disorders Christine Young Walden University NURS 6501N- 43, Advanced Pathophysiology October 20 th , 2018
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2 Gastrointestinal Disorders Advanced practice nurses see patients that can present with a multitude of symptoms that correlate with many different disorders. And, through understanding the normal physiology of the human body, and the complex relationships between each system, or organ, and the potential pathologies that may alter them ensuing in disease, a clearer diagnosis, and treatment can be made. The topic of this paper will identify the normal physiology of gastric acid production and stimulation, and it’s related pathophysiology and alterations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcer disease (PUD), and gastritis. Including a look at behavioral factors that either prevent or promote any of these disorders and identifying the correct diagnosis and treatment plan based on this factor. A mind map for gastritis is included that identifies the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for gastritis. Gastric Acid Production The gastrointestonal system includes the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum, and anus (Huether and McCance, 2017). This system is responsible for the digestion of food and elimination of waste through many processes, such as gastric secretions, enzymes, absorption, peristalsis, and excretion. Of all the substances secreted in the stomach for the process of digestion hydrochloric acid (HCL) is the most important related to pathophysiological processes (Hammer and McPhee, 2014). HCl production is stimulated by acetylcholine, gastrin, and histamine which stimulate the H+-K+ATPase a primary active transporter to release HCl into the lumen of the stomach. This happens during the cephalic phase of digestion, which is thinking, seeing or smelling food, or the gastric phase or distention of the stomach, and the intestinal phase. However, the release of somatostatin, secretin, and cholecystokinin inhibits acid secretion in a negative feedback loop effect (Hammer and McPhee,
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  • Fall '17
  • keisha lovence
  • gastritis

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