NEW 375 Lecture10(2) - Introduction WHAT DO A JAR OF...

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Introduction WHAT DO A JAR OF RELISH, A DOORKNOB AND A CROSS WRENCH HAVE IN COMMON?
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F F d T TORQUE = T = F x d =COUPLE
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T F F d TORQUE = T = F x d =COUPLE
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T F F d TORQUE = T = F x d =COUPLE
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Torsion: Objectives Determine the effects of applying a torsional loading to a long straight member such as a shaft or tube. Determine the stress distribution within the member. Determine the angle of twist when the member behaves in a linear-elastic manner.
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What is torque? Torque is a moment that tends to twist a member about its longitudinal axis . T T (right hand rule)
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Engineering Applications The most common application is provided by transmission shafts, which are used to transmit power from one point to another, as from a steam turbine to an electric generator, or from a motor to a machine tool, or from the engine to the rear axle of an automobile.
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Example of a Transmission Shaft
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Preliminary Discussion of the Stresses in a Shaft Shaft AB Subjected to Torque
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FBD of Section BC of Shaft = We must have shearing forces dF perpendicular to the axis of the shaft, i.e., on the plane of shaft, which portion AC exerts on BC when the shaft is twisted.
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dF = τ dA Line of action of the differential force dF is in the plane of the cross-section and is perpendicular to the radius ρ ( 29 ( 29 τ ρ = ρ = = dA dF dT T INTERNAL TORSIONAL MOMENT Note that the sum of the moments of the differential shearing forces [ dF = τ dA ] about the axis of the shaft is equal in magnitude to the torque T. If we knew the distribution of shear stress ( τ ), then we could evaluate the integral. As shown later, τ is not distributed uniformly. 90 deg.
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NEW 375 Lecture10(2) - Introduction WHAT DO A JAR OF...

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