2DMotiona - Physics 201: Lecture 3 Recap of 1-D motion with...

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3/27/08 Physics 201, UW-Madison 1 Physics 201: Lecture Physics 201: Lecture 3 3 Recap of 1-D motion with constant acceleration 1-D free fall examples Basics of Vectors 2-D and 3-D Kinematics Independence of x and y components Demos: incline plane w/metronome, feather & penny
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3/27/08 Physics 201, UW-Madison 2 Question Question An object is dropped from rest. If it falls a distance D in time t then how far will if fall in a time 2t ? 1. D/4 2. D/2 3. D 4. 2D 5. 4D Correct x=1/2 at 2 Follow-up question: If the object has speed v at time t then what is the speed at time 2t ? 1. v/4 2. v/2 3. v 4. 2v 5. 4v Correct v=at
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3/27/08 Physics 201, UW-Madison 3 Review: Review: For constant acceleration we found: From which we derived: x a v t t t
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3/27/08 Physics 201, UW-Madison 4 1-D Free-Fall 1-D Free-Fall This is a nice example of constant acceleration (gravity): In this case, acceleration is caused by the force of gravity: Usually pick y -axis “upward” Acceleration of gravity is “down” : y a y = g v t a t y t
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3/27/08 Physics 201, UW-Madison 5 Gravity facts: Gravity facts: g does not depend on the nature of the material! Galileo (1564-1642) figured this out without fancy clocks Nominally, g = 9.81 m/s 2 At the equator g = 9.78 m/s 2 At the North pole g = 9.83 m/s 2 More on gravity later.
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3/27/08 Physics 201, UW-Madison 6 Dennis and Carmen are standing on the edge of a cliff. Dennis throws a basketball vertically upward, and at the same time Carmen throws a basketball vertically downward with the same initial speed. You are standing below the cliff observing this strange behavior. Whose ball hits the ground at the base of the cliff first? 1. Dennis' ball
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2008 for the course PHYS 201 taught by Professor Walker during the Spring '08 term at Wisconsin.

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2DMotiona - Physics 201: Lecture 3 Recap of 1-D motion with...

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