Chapter 3_ Culture and Mass Media.pdf - Chapter 3 Culture and Mass Media Culture Concepts and Applications Culture the beliefs norms behaviors and

Chapter 3_ Culture and Mass Media.pdf - Chapter 3 Culture...

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Chapter 3: Culture and Mass Media Culture: Concepts and Applications Culture : the beliefs, norms, behaviors, and products common to the members of a particular group Integral to our social experience of the world Helps form our identities and gives meaning to the artifacts and experiences of our lives Shapes and permeates material objects Material and Nonmaterial Culture Material culture : physical objects created, embraced, or consumed by society that help shape people’s lives Television programs, computer games, software, and other artifacts of human creation Emerges from the physical environment inhabited by the community Includes types of shelters that characterize a community Nonmaterial culture : abstract creations of human cultures, including ideas about behavior and living Social experience such as behavioral norms, values, language, family forms, and institutions Reflects the natural environment Material culture and nonmaterial culture are intertwined Nonmaterial culture may attach particular meanings to the objects of material culture Concept Characteristics Values General ideas about what is good, right, or just in a culture Norms Culturally shared rules governing social behavior (“oughts” and “shoulds” Folkways Conventions (or weak norms), the violation of which is not very serious Mores Strongly held norms, the violation of which is very offensive Taboos Very strongly held norms, the violation of which is highly offensive and even unthinkable Laws Norms that have been codified Beliefs Particular ideas that people accept as true Beliefs
May be understood as real when they are real in their consequences They need not be objectively true Dynamic rather than static Norms Common rules of a culture that govern the behavior of people belonging to that culture Guide behavioral choices such as where to stand relative to others in an elevator, how long to hold someone’s gaze in conversation, how to conduct the rites of passage that mark different stages in life, and how to resolve disagreements Some norms are enshrined in legal statuses; others are inscribed in our psyches and consciences Folkways Generally passed down from the past The violation is generally not considered serious within a particular culture Mores Violation of which seriously offends the standards of acceptable conduct of most people within a particular culture Taboos Commonly reserved for behavior that is extremely offensive Laws Formalize and institutionalize society’s norms Values Components of nonmaterial culture in every society Attach to institutions of society at multiple levels Widening split in political values in the US population, most acutely along partisan lines Growing differences in expressed attitudes about issues ranging from social welfare to traditional family values Structural functionalists have proposed that values play a critical role in the social integration of a society Values do not play this role by themselves

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