Chapter 13 Apush.docx - Chapter 13 Expansion War and...

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Chapter 13- Expansion, War, and Sectional Crisis 1844-60 Expansionist- someone who wants to expand the US, and are willing to go through warfare, theft, etc. Manifest Destiny: 1840s-1850s; an American concept where America is destining to have a specific amount of land (from Atlantic Ocean to Pacific Ocean); it has a religious and racial aspect to it; Americans believe because God wants them to have the land, he will give them the ability to take it from “non-white” people. Oregon Territory: (WA, OR, MN, Upper part of UT, WY, ID, Upper of CA) claimed by England and the US, fur trade and missionaries Dangers of Oregon: flash flood, Natives attack Oregon Trail: 165,000 settlers and 85,000 going to CA: Oregon and California are unclaimed land, but only free white men or descendants of free white men could claim the land California: part of Mexico; cheap land to encourage livestock The Plains: underdeveloped land (OK and all northwest of OK) Natives moved to the plains close to 1 million; Natives occupied KA, NA, SD, ND Small pox epidemic – continuity Effect of Natives having guns- Natives would fight each other over trade connection with England (social division) Use of guns from Natives and US- Overkill of buffalos to the point of almost extinction Picture: Manifest Destiny woman illuminates land that God is leading Americans; Her outfit describes republicanism Gag rule- no talking about slavery because it can lead to warfare Election of 1844: Texas is annex (not an official state but is US territory); James Polk (Democrat) is president What was discuss during election: Expand or not; how to expand; slavery or free territory (biggest issue) Polk is an Expansionist “Fifty-four- Forty or Fight”- Polk campaign saying that US should have the Oregon Territory all the way up to the 50-40 line Missouri Compromise agreed as unconstitutional Some people did not want to fight but did want expansion Texas becomes a state in 1845 (slave state) 1845: the Missouri Compromise is still active for another decade
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