SOCI 316 - Part 2 Maintaining Relationships.docx - SOCI 316...

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SOCI 316 - Part 2 Maintaining Relationships Chapter 5 - Our Sexual Selves Sexual Development and Orientation Sexual Orientation: whether an individual prefers a partner of the same or opposite sex (not to be confused with sexual preferences) Heterosexuals: are attracted to opposite sex Homosexuals: attracted to same sex partners Sexual orientation may be a continuum; freud believed we are bisexual in the sense that we all possess the latent physiological and emotional structures to sexually respond to both sexes Interactionist point of view: the labels are social inventions from when sexologists emerged, it was created by social interactions and not by nature People may develop sexual orientations due to being raised in that dichotomy; people may sort themselves in categories and behave accordingly Theoretical Perspectives on Human Sexuality The Interactionist Perspective (Negotiating Cultural Messages) The way people think of sex has a lot to do with the messages society gives them Such as: legitimate reasons to have sex, who should take initiative, how long it should last, how important is an orgasm, what positions, is masturbation okay The interactionist perspective on human sexuality: women and men negotiate and are influenced by the “sexual scripts” they learn from society Evolutionary Psychology (Is Anatomy Destiny) They argue that humans have an evolutionary biological origin that affects their sexual relations Darwin’s survival of the fittest principle: only the stronger, more intelligent, and adaptable of species survive to reproduce, a process where the entire species is strengthened and prospers over time Purpose is to pass down their biological heredity material Females: can only realistically have one offspring per year, causing her to discriminate their partners to have real chance of passing down her genes Males: each new mate is a chance to pass down their genetic makeup so they are more inclined to have multiple partners + it was found that men associate sex with power An historical perspective Early Canada: Patriarcal sex Patriarchal sexuality: many beliefs, values, attitudes, and behaviours developed to protect the male line of descent Exclusive sexual possession by a man of woman in a
monogamous marriage; children are legitimately his; man owns her sexuality Sex is a physiological activity used for procreation (male - born with a sex drive; women - naturally sexually passive) Male can have multiple partners but not a woman, are she was labelled as loose This perspective could not be maintained in the evolution of society, since gender role expectations started to change Research and facts of women vs men sexuality on p.111 20th century: the emergence of expressive sexuality Expressive sexuality: sees sexuality as basic to the humanness of both women and men; no one-sided sense of ownership Due to societal changes (decreasing dependence of women on

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