TME II.docx - TME II Using Box 8.3 in Riedmann et al(2003...

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TME II Using Box 8.3 in Riedmann et al., (2003, pp. 244–245), respond to the first two questions in the first paragraph, utilizing the research information in the remainder of the Box. [If you are a male, answer the questions as the husband of your wife making the decision of changing her name.] Provide a short demographic description of the relevant characteristics of yourself; e.g., male or female, age, living situation, social class, race/ethnicity, religion, urban/rural, etc. Personally, I agree with the women who decided to use their maiden names for professional purposes and the husband’s name for social reasons (Riedmann et al., 2003, pp. 245). As a female working towards a career, my last name symbolizes my identity and everything I’ve accomplished in my 21 years. Growing up, my father's name was quite known, and still is in the French school district. This is due to his outstanding reputation as an educator and as principal, to his students and peers alike. Therefore, today I feel as though my name holds a standard for the quality of my work, as well as my character, and I would prefer not to lose that sense of empowerment. However, I do believe sharing a family name creates a sense of unity between the spouses and their children. This attests to the premise of marriage, permanence, and primariness, such as the commitment of both partners to keeping each other as the most important people in each other's lives (2003, pp. 229). In Jean M. Twenge’s study, a woman states: “The same last name would symbolize this ‘two becoming one’ idea” (2003, pp. 244), which I believe to be a rudimentary idea for the type of family I envision having. It is clear to me that my parents have heavily influenced my own family ideals. Some prominent characteristics that stem from these ideals include having involved parents, a middle-class family, part of a leftist sect of Islam, part of the Franco-Ontarian community (due to my fathers European/Belgian nationality), influenced by Indian and Canadian culture. Important to note that my mother kept her maiden name for professional purposes and legally changed it to my father's last name 7 years after their union, as an anniversary gift to represent her commitment to him and our family. Choosing to change your name after marriage is highly dependant on the nature of the parents' relationships, the individual and societal definition of marriage and what the last name symbolizes for the individual. Looking from a sociological perspective, when American men and women were asked if they would marry a person with all the qualities they desired in a partner but did not “love” them, 86% responded with “No” (Riedmann et al., 2003, pp. 183). This tells us North Americans are more likely to marry for love and by consequence, the decision to change one's name is more likely to be an individual choice as well. Although not as prominent, religion and culture are currently keeping the tradition of accepting the husband last name alive.

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