PSY 1010 Syllabus - Introductory Psychology PSY 1010 Fall 2018 TTh 11:30 AM 12:45 PM Instructor Location Email Phone Office Dr Richard Slatcher Ph.D

PSY 1010 Syllabus - Introductory Psychology PSY 1010 Fall...

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Unformatted text preview: Introductory Psychology – PSY 1010 Fall 2018 TTh: 11:30 AM – 12:45 PM Instructor: Location: Email: Phone: Office: Dr. Richard Slatcher, Ph.D. General Lectures 100 [email protected] (313) 577-9091 (but email is usually the quickest and best way to reach me) Department of Psychology, 5057 Woodward, Rm. 8405.2 (eighth floor) (This is the tall building, just North of Warren with large antenna on roof. Also known as the Maccabees Building) Office: Hours Thursdays from 3-5 or by appointment in my office (see office information above) TAs: Lama Ayoub, Christina Dandar, Shay Excell, Kylie Kadey, Liyah Marshall, Danny Mulligan I. Course Overview Welcome to Introductory Psychology. This is one of my favorite courses to teach. As you will soon learn, psychology is a relatively young discipline that examines how we think, feel, and behave. We will cover most of the basic concepts of psychology: biological bases of behavior, learning, memory, intelligence, development, personality, motivation, social psychology, emotion, stress, psychological disorders, treatment, and positive psychology. I think you will find this course both fun and interesting. But I want to emphasize off the bat that psychology is a science based heavily on research. My aim as your professor is to get you excited not only about everyday psychology, but about psychological research as well. Throughout this course, we will weave through a number of real-world examples illustrating psychological research in action and we will have a number of in-class demonstrations, experiments, and video clips. If there is one thing that I want you to get out of this course, it is for you to start thinking like a research psychologist. In your daily interactions with your friends, family, romantic partners, acquaintances and others, start thinking about why it is that other people think and behave in the ways they do. And why it is that you think and behave in the ways that you do. By the end of the semester, you should be coming up with testable hypotheses…and then be able go and test them. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: • Identify and describe the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology. 1 • • • • • Apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation. Apply scientific reasoning and skepticism concerning psychological and behavioral concepts and issues. Describe the connection of Psychology with other life and physical sciences. Understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, cultural, and organizational issues. Understand the nature of a career in the different sub-disciplines of Psychology, and curriculum options available in the Psychology department. II. Course Materials and Learning Resources A. Required materials: 1. R. Biswas-Diener & E. Diener (Eds), Noba Textbook Series: Discover Psychology 2.0 – A Brief Introductory Text. Champaign, IL: DEF Publishers. DOI: nobaproject.com. (NOTE: This is a FREE online text, which has been posted on Canvas). 2. Supplementary readings posted on Canvas. 3. Lab Manual for Introductory Psychology. Wayne State University Psychology Department. 4. An i>clicker response device (“clicker”). This is ABSOLUTELY REQUIRED. The clicker can be sold back to the bookstore at the end of the semester, just like a textbook. (See below for information on the original i>clicker vs. the i>clicker2.) 5. Scantron forms, F-14501 (the orange ones, available at the bookstore on campus) for exams. B. Internet site: Wayne State University relies on Canvas as our Learning Management System. Canvas has a system of automatic notifications to students for things like changes in due dates for assignments, meeting times, announcements from faculty, etc. Students are responsible for ensuring that the settings in their Canvas account allow them to receive announcements and other notifications from within Canvas. Instructors are not responsible for ensuring that students receive notification through systems other than Canvas. It is up to the student to ensure that they are able to receive course information from instructors through Canvas. There will be two web sites for this course on Canvas. The “Lecture site” is maintained by Prof. Slatcher for course readings, lecture materials, i>clicker grades, and resources. For exam grades and laboratory grades and information, use the laboratory section site maintained by your TA. Emails sent to the entire class will also be sent through Canvas. If you are having difficulty using Canvas, please seek advice from your TA during office hours or make an appointment. C. Lecture Resources: Lecture slides are available on the lecture Canvas site. I will usually post them by the evening before the lecture. 2 D. Textbook: I will post a PDF of the textbook on the lecture Canvas site. I will also post supplementary chapters for certain topics there as well. E. Old Exams. I will post old exams from previous years for this course on Canvas. Note that different editions of textbooks were used in previous times that I have taught this course. In addition, each class was organized differently. Study the tests closely but don't bother memorizing things. Perhaps a small group of old test items will be used on this semester's exams, but perhaps not. III. Lecture Schedule Any modifications or changes to this schedule will be posted on the lecture Canvas site. Date Thursday Aug 30 Tuesday Sept 4 Thursday Sept 6 Topic Psychology: What makes us tick? Using psychological science to understand the human mind Research methods in psychology Tuesday Sept 11 Brain & Behavior I: Neurons Thursday Sept 13 Brain & Behavior II: The Brain Tuesday Sept 18 Learning: How to get those rodents in your dorm room to play soccer and salivate when they win Guest Lecturer: Christina Dandar Exam 1 Memory encoding and storage Thursday Sept 20 Tuesday Sept 25 Thursday Sept 27 Tuesday Oct 2 Memory retrieval and forgetting: Why getting excited about your courses helps you get better grades Guest Lecturer: Kylie Kadey Cognitive development across the lifespan: Why infants love to play peek-a3 Reading/Assignment Ch 1: Why Science? (pp. 5 – 15) Ch 2: Research Designs (pp. 17 – 32) Ch 3: Conducting Psychology Research in the Real World (pp. 33 – 50) Your i<clicker must be purchased and registered by today! Ch. 4: The Brain and Nervous System (pp. 52 – 66) Ch. 4: The Brain and Nervous System (pp. 52 – 66) Ch. 13: Conditioning and Learning (pp. 204 – 229) Ch. 14: Memory (pp. 231 – 253) Ch. 15: Eyewitness Testimony and Memory Biases (pp. 254 – 266) Ch. 8: Cognitive Development in Thursday Oct 4 Tuesday Oct 9 Thursday Oct 11 Tuesday Oct 16 Thursday Oct 18 Tuesday Oct 23 Thursday Oct 25 Tuesday Oct 30 Thursday Nov 1 Tuesday Nov 6 Thursday Nov 8 Tuesday Nov 13 Thursday Nov 15 Tuesday Nov 20 boo but toddlers don’t Social and moral development Guest Lecturer: Lama Ayoub Childhood (pp. 108 – 122) Ch. 9: Social and Personality Development in Childhood (pp. 123 – 138) Nature vs. Nurture: Do we act the way we Ch. 5: Evolutionary do because it’s in our genes or because of Theories in Psychology how our parents raised us? (pp. 67 – 81) Guest Lecturer: Danny Mulligan Ch. 6: The Nature-Nurture Question (pp. 82 – 94) Intelligence Ch. 18: (pp. 297 - 310) Exam 2 Freud and personality: Can we control Supplementary Reading 1: our drives for sex, drugs and rock n’ roll? “The Psychodynamic Perspective” Personality traits and assessment: Why Ch. 22: Personality Traits having your roommate take a personality (pp. 367 – 383) test before coming to college might have Ch. 23: Personality been a good idea Assessment (pp. 384 – 403) Thinking and Language: How mental Ch. 16: Judgment and shortcuts can lead to mental mistakes Decision Making (pp. 268 – 281) Ch. 17: Language and Language Use (pp. 282 – 296) Motivation: You can’t always get what Ch. 19: Drive States (pp. you want, but if you try sometimes, you 312 – 324) get what you need Ch. 21: Motives and Goals (pp. 349 – 365) Emotion Ch. 20: Culture and Emotion (pp. 325 – 348) Stress and health: Why you often catch a Ch. 36: The Healthy Life cold after finals (pp. 625 – 629) Guest Lecturer: Liyah Marshall Coping with stress Ch. 36: The Healthy Life (pp. 629 – 644) Exam 3 Psychological disorders I Ch. 25: Anxiety and Guest Lecturer: Shay Excell Related Disorders (pp. 423 – 442) Ch. 26: Mood Disorders (p. 443 – 464) Psychological disorders II Ch. 27: Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders (pp. 4 465 – 486) Ch. 28: Personality Disorders (pp. 487 – 501) Thursday Nov 22 Tuesday Nov 27 NO CLASS - THANKSGIVING Treatment of psychological disorders Thursday Nov 29 Social psychology: When and why do people act naughty or nice? Tuesday Dec 4 Attraction, love, and relationships Thursday Dec 6 Happiness and well-being Tuesday Dec 18 FINAL EXAM, 10:15 am – 12:15 pm Ch. 29: Therapeutic Orientations (pp. 503 – 521) Ch. 30: Psychopharmacology (pp. 522 – 535) Ch. 31: Social Cognition and Attitudes (pp. 538 – 557) Ch. 32: Conformity and Obedience (pp. 558 – 570) Ch. 34: Prejudice, Discrimination and Stereotyping (pp. 591 – 606) Supplementary Readings 2, 3 and 4: “Attraction and Beauty,” “Love, Friendship and Social Support” and “Positive Relationships” Ch. 35: Happiness – The Science of Subjective Well-Being (pp. 608 – 624) General Lectures 100 IV. Exams There will be four exams in this course. Each exam is worth 200 points and will be comprised of 50 multiple-choice questions worth 4 points each. The final exam (4th exam), which is during the final exam period, is non-cumulative. Exams will cover material from lectures, the text, and supplementary article readings. This is an idea class as opposed to a fact class. I am more concerned with what Freud or Skinner thought than with their birthdays or favorite colors. All of the tests will emphasize psychological concepts and their relationships to other concepts and to real-world examples. From my experience, the best way to be prepared for tests is to read all of the material and attend all lectures. Afterwards, talk with others in the class about the topics we’ve covered. Actively talking with others about theories and ideas of the course helps to organize them in your mind. Indeed, we will discuss research evidence that supports this strategy. 5 YOU MUST BRING AN ORANGE SCANTRON FORM AND #2 PENCIL FOR EACH EXAM; THESE CANNOT BE PROVIDED FOR YOU. YOU MUST BRING YOUR UNIVERSITY ID (ONE CARD) TO THE EXAM; YOUR IDENTITY MAY BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU ARE ALLOWED TO TURN IN THE EXAM. All exams will start promptly at 11:30 AM. You are expected to show up on time and prepared to take the test. In the interest of test security, once the first student completes the exam and leaves the room, no student will be allowed to start the exam. You must have a University-approved excuse to miss an exam. If you miss an exam and do not have a University-approved excuse, you will receive a zero for that exam. University-approved excuses for missing an exam: 1) Participating in a University-approved athletic event or performance (music, dance, debate, etc.) which occurs at the time of the exam. You must let me know of the event at least one week before the exam, and you must provide documentation of the function from the coach, coordinator, etc. 2) You have a religious holiday that requires that you not attend class at the time of the exam. You must let me know of the holiday at least one week before the exam to be excused. (Please review the dates of exams now if this could pose a conflict for you.) 3) You are ill, and can prove it. You must bring me a doctor’s note dated the day of the exam. You must also let me know of the illness no later than the start of the exam (11:30am). 4) Attendance of a funeral within one week of the exam. You must bring a note from the funeral home indicating your attendance at the funeral. 5) Your have transportation issues and can prove it with documentation (e.g. police report, towing receipt, car repair bill). Traffic issues will not be considered, so you need to allow plenty of time to reach campus. Failure to meet these requirements will result in a zero for the exam. If you do meet one of the requirements to take a make-up exam, the make-up exam may be either a multiple choice/short answer exam or an essay exam, at the instructor’s discretion. To schedule a University-approved makeup exam, email your TA and be sure to do so within 24 hours of the originally scheduled exam. The final exam: The final exam is on Tuesday, DECEMBER 18th, in the regular classroom, from 10:15 am – 12:15 pm. Please do not plan holiday travel for before this date –students may NOT take the final at an earlier date to accommodate holiday travel. To reiterate, the final is simply the 4th exam and non-cumulative. 6 According to Wayne State University policy for final exams, “Students are not required to take more than two exams in one day. A student with more than two scheduled final exams on one day may (not must) petition to the instructor of the course with the lowest number students enrolled, to arrange an alternate time for the final exam. Such petitions must be made at least one week prior to the scheduled date of the final exam.” Since PSY 1010 is one of the larger classes offered at Wayne State, students seeking to take advantage of this policy will in all likelihood need to re-schedule the final exam from one of their other courses (other than MAT 0993). V. Peer Instruction/Participation using the i>clicker An i>clicker remote is required for in-class participation and voting in this course. For this class, you have the option of purchasing an i>clicker2 remote from the Campus Bookstore. Instructions for using both remotes are on the back of the remote. IMPORTANT INFORMATION BEFORE PURCHASING YOUR I>CLICKER: Registering your i>clicker on time We will be using a Classroom Response System called i>clicker. You MUST have an i>clicker purchased and registered online by Thursday of the second week of class (Sept. 6). To register the i>clicker, log into our course on Canvas, and click on the “Register your clicker” button. If you have not properly registered your i>clicker online prior to class on September 6 when we first use the i>clickers, you will not be able to earn any i>clicker points. Purchasing your i>clicker When purchasing your clicker, be sure to consider whether any of your other courses may specifically require an i>clicker2 remote. While I will only ask Multiple Choice questions in class, you may need an i>clicker2 remote for answering numeric/alphanumeric questions in another course, in which case you’d want to get an i>clicker2. Daily Participation and Peer Instruction (PI) Points with the i>clicker Attendance is not compulsory for this course – you do not receive any points simply for attending class. However, if you do not attend, you will not be able to earn that day’s Peer Instruction (PI) and/or Participation points. Thus, though it is not required, attendance is rewarded. Sometimes I will ask questions in class to see if people understand the material presented, or to gather the opinions of students on a particular topic. These questions will count towards daily participation. Peer Instruction is a process I will use in lecture to present questions in class that require you to apply what you have learned, and to reason your way through to the correct answer. You’ll first 7 be asked to answer each question independently using your i>clicker, and then there will time for class members to discuss the question with each other and answer a second time. Thus, even if you miss the question the first time, you’ll still have a chance to earn a point based on what you learn in the discussion with your classmates. There will generally be two or three Peer Instruction opportunities each lecture, though on occasion I will not get to all of them – unfortunately, that can’t be helped, so some days may have one PI opportunities, and others will have three. PI opportunities are NOT extra credit – they are part of the total points possible for the class. YOU ARE REQUIRED TO COMPLETE THE PEER INSTRUCTION QUESTIONS YOURSELF – HAVING SOMEONE ELSE “CLICK IN” FOR YOU IS A VIOLATION OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY, AND WILL BE TREATED AS SUCH. AT A MINIMUM, YOU WILL LOSE ALL CLICKER POINTS FOR THE SEMESTER. On days in which we do not get to all of the PI items, the remaining points for that day will be earned based on Participation. Between Peer Instruction and Participation items, there will be five (5) points available each day in class. Students participate simply by clicking in with their i>clickers to 80% of that day’s i>clicker opportunities. Thus, for example, if there are two PI opportunities in class on a given day, and six other questions using the i>clickers, then there would be four points available through PI (two points for each PI opportunity), and one point available for participation. Students who clicked in (with any answer) on 8 of the 10 total opportunities that day would earn that participation point. VI. Other Requirements 1. Laboratory. You must attend the laboratory section of this course, which represents 25% of the total course points. Partial completion of laboratory assignments will significantly decrease your grade. It is therefore critical to attend each lab session and complete all of the assigned work. Grading scales and policies for the lab sections will be fully explained by your TA at the first lab meeting. The laboratory meets apart from the lecture, and a separate syllabus will be distributed during the first meeting of the laboratory, which will be the second week of class. Your lab section meets once per week. While the lab sections and lecture are separate, there is considerable overlap in the material that is covered. The timing of the presentation of topics is not always synchronized between lecture and lab. However, there will be times where I will refer you to information presented in the lab that you will be responsible for on lecture exams. Three hundred (300) points (25%) of your final grade come from the weekly laboratory sessions that accompany the lecture sessions. Your TA will tell you how your lab grade is determined during the first week of the lab sessions. It is essential that you attend and participate actively in the lab. Attendance is required for the weekly laboratory sessions. Attendance at lab is recorded, and a portion of your laboratory grade is based on attendance. The syllabus for the laboratory session will give more details on this. You must understand that the lecture component of class and the laboratory component of class may not always be covering the same topics. I make every effort to keep them as closely aligned 8 as possible, but there are times (especially towards the end of the semester) when the lab will be ahead of the lecture. 2. Research Requirement: You are required to earn a total of 3 credits for research participation. You can fulfill this requirement in one of three ways: 1. Option 1: Participate as a subject in a research experiment conducted by a faculty member of the department of Psychology. Typically, one hour of participation = 1 credit; these values are assigned by the directors of the research experiments, not your instructor. The Psychology Department utilizes an online system (called the SONA system) for signing-up for research participation, and for the tracking and assignment of research credits. A detailed description of how to access and use this system is below and also posted in the Course Information section of the lecture Canvas site. How to Sign up for Experiments: All Wayne State University psychology research experiments are set-up via an online system. You MUST access this system if you wish to be able to participate in psychological research. To access this research system, a...
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