Sense and Sensibility: Social Context - Chapters 11-20.docx...

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Sense and Sensibility: Social Context - Chapters 11-20 Objectives Articulate and support explicit meaning. Analyze a key passage and comment on how it illuminates the work as a whole. Determine where text leaves matters uncertain. Draw insightful inferences from the text. Support textual analysis with strong textual evidence. Determine how themes or central ideas interact or build on one another. Analyze the purpose and effect of an author’s choices regarding story elements. Analyze the relationship between ideas (e.g., reason and emotion, good and evil) as illustrated in literature of a certain period. Explain how literary elements contribute to meaning and author intention. Analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone. Evaluate the aesthetic quality of language in context. Explain the use of satire, irony, sarcasm, or understatement as a technique to reveal authorial intent. Participate in collaborative discussions on grade level topics, texts, and issues. Express ideas clearly and persuasively in collaborative contexts. Build on others’ ideas in the context of collaborative discussions. Gather vocabulary knowledge independently to assist in comprehension. Analyze nuances in meaning of words with similar denotations. Vocabulary predictions assumptions about future events based on information in a passage Vocab Arcade Marianne and Willoughby As you learned in the last lesson, during the time period in which this novel was written, society had certain views about what was proper and improper in social relationships, particularly between young women and men. Click here to read chapters 11-20 of Sense and Sensibility. When Marianne reveals to Elinor that Willoughby has given her a horse, Marianne is in raptures, but practical Elinor believes it a bad idea, and the two young ladies argue. Elinor’s objections are twofold. Elinor’s Objections Marianne’s Argument Final Resolution
First, a horse requires a great deal of money to take care off—money that Mrs. Dashwood cannot afford: '“Without considering that it was not in her mother’s plan to keep any horse, that if she were to alter her resolution in favour of this gift, she must buy another for the servant, and keep a servant to ride it, and after all, build a stable to receive them, she had accepted the present without hesitation …”' The romantic and unrealistic Marianne resists her sister’s ideas: '“Most unwilling was she to awaken from such a dream of felicity to comprehend all the unhappy truths which attended the affair; and for some time she refused to submit to them. As to an additional servant, the expense would be a trifle; Mama she was sure would never object to it; and any horse would do for HIM; he might always get one at the park; as to a stable, the merest shed would be sufficient.”' Only after repeated appeals to the well- being of their mother, who would probably give in to Marianne (but who would eventually suffer the hardship of the economic burden),

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