Week4assgnEshunA.docx - 1 Disorders of the Veins and Arteries Adwoa Eshun Walden University NURS 6501 Advanced Pathophysiology Week 4 Assignment 2

Week4assgnEshunA.docx - 1 Disorders of the Veins and...

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Disorders of the Veins and Arteries 1 Adwoa Eshun Walden University NURS 6501: Advanced Pathophysiology December 23, 2018 Week 4 Assignment
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Disorders of the Veins and Arteries 2 As healthcare providers, we know that the human body is made of numerous organs and systems that require us to maintain the upkeep of the body. The venous system helps provide the oxygenated blood that our bodies need to maintain homeostasis within the body. It is a priority to recognize when the body is not being adequately supplied with the nutrients it needs to function. When the vascular system does not meet the demands of the body, clotting begins to form which can cause swelling, pain, and damage to vital tissues. Deep Venous Thrombosis, Chronic Venous Insufficiency, and arterial thrombosis are just some various adverse effects when the clotting has not improved. The purpose of this paper is to examine and discuss the pathophysiology of Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) and Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI). I will also explain the dif- ferences between venous thrombosis and arterial thrombosis. Lastly, mind maps on both DVT and CVI focusing on clinical presentation, pathophysiology, epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment plans will be presented. Deep Venous Thrombosis Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot (thrombus) forms in one or more of the deep veins in your body, usually in your legs ( Mayo Clinic, 2018). Deep Venous Throm - bosis is considered a serious threat due to clots potentially breaking up and moving within the bloodstream. The clots can also move within the lungs, which can lead to a pulmonary em - bolism. Some of the significant risk factors in developing DVT are age, immobility, smoking, obesity, birth control or hormone replacement therapies and heart failure (Laureate Education, 2012). Patient's who have had trauma or orthopedic surgery are also highly at risk for developing a DVT. Symptoms of DVT include pain, redness, and swelling, tenderness usually at the thigh or calf and warmth in the affected leg. In some few cases, patients who experience DVT will some - times be asymptomatic. To diagnose DVT, a health history is taken and a physical exam is done
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  • Spring '15
  • Thrombosis, Venous insufficiency

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