Chapter 4 Outline.docx - CHAPTER FOUR OUTLINE CIVIL LIBERTIES Please refer to the menu under the Class Notes icon for US Supreme Court Cases to learn

Chapter 4 Outline.docx - CHAPTER FOUR OUTLINE CIVIL...

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CHAPTER FOUR OUTLINE CIVIL LIBERTIES Please refer to the menu under the Class Notes icon for US Supreme Court Cases to learn what each case that is cited is about and how it is associated with the amendment in question. Also refer to the list of key terms that accompanies this outline for definitions. I. ��� Define Civil Liberties A. Limits on the Power of the National Government ����� B. Mainly found in the Bill of Rights ����� C. Apply to All Persons, not just Citizens ����� D. Distinguish from Civil Rights ����� II. �� Define Incorporation Theory A. What is the role of the 14th Amendment? ����� B. What Rights are not Incorporated? ����� C. Cases Related to the Process-See Table 4-1 ����� 1. ��������� Barron v Baltimore (1833 ) 2. ��������� The Slaughterhouse Case (1873) 3. ��������� Gitlow v New York (1925) III. The First Amendment-Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, of the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. ����� Freedom of Religion A. ������ The Establishment Clause -No Official (Government) Church or Religion- Separation of Church & State 1. ���������� Everson v Board of Education (1947) 2. ���������� Engle v Vitale (1962) 3. ���������� Lemon v Kurtzman (1971) B. ������ The Free-Exercise Clause -Individual Freedom to Worship-Seek Balance of Freedom and Safety 1. ���������� Reynolds v US (1879 ) 2. ���������� Cantwell v Connecticut (1940) ���� �� Freedom of Speech A. Types of Unprotected Speech ������ 1. ����������� Subversive/Seditious Speech A. ��������������� Schenck v U.S. (1919) B. ��������������� Dennis v U.S. (1952) 2. ����������� Obscenity (Roth-Miller Test) A. Material violates contemporary community standards ��������������� B. Promotes prurient interest in sex ��������������� C. Shows offensive sexual conduct ��������������� D. Lacks artistic, political, scientific, or literary merit
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  • Fall '15
  • Christine Gottemoller
  • Government, The Land, First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Jury trial, Rights of the accused

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