Week 5 Final Paper.docx - RUNNING HEAD Reproductive Health...

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RUNNING HEAD: Reproductive Health 1 Margaret Higgins Sanger - Reproductive Health Danielle Salazar HCA 415 Community & Public Health Instructor: Wanda Carter-Calhoun September 28, 2018
2 Reproductive Health Margaret Higgins Sanger - Reproductive Health Margaret Higgins Sanger was born on September 14, 1879 in Corning, New York. Margaret was an American activist, sex educator, writer, and nurse. Margaret also attended Claverack College and Hudson River Institute, before enrolling in 1900 at White Plains Hospital as a nurse probationer. She married her first husband William Sanger (1902–1921), then married her second husband James Noah H. Slee (1922–1943), and she has three children. According to Wikipedia contributors, in 1916, Sanger opened the first birth control clinic in the United States, and later she was arrested for giving information and pamphlets on contraceptives and family planning. In 1921, Sanger founded the American Birth Control League, which later became the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Margaret Sanger was a feminist and educated women on how to prevent unwanted pregnancies and the importance of birth control, and she wrote many books and traveled around the world to help women across the country. Margert Higgins Sanger passed away from congestive heart failure on September 6, 1966 in Tucson, Arizona at age 86, but her legacy and honor lives on. During the mid-1800s to 1900s, the Comstock Law prevented the distribution of information regarding contraceptives in America, so therefore this was illegal. Many people were against Margaret and wanted her to stop giving family planning and contraceptive information during her movement of the birth control era. Sanger helped to repeal the Comstock Act and similar laws so that women could legally use contraceptives to control their fertility and the sizes of their families. “ On October 16, 1916, Sanger opened a family planning and birth control clinic at 46 Amboy Street in the Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn, the first of its kind in the United States, and nine days after the clinic opened, Sanger was arrested,” (Wikipedia
3 Reproductive Health contributors. (2018, September 12). This did not stop her from trying to spread her knowledge and education to other women who did not want pregnancies and wanted to learn how to prevent them and keep them safe from having to do abortions. Over the course of her career, Sanger was arrested at least eight times for expressing her views during an era in which speaking publicly about contraception was illegal. Margaret Higgins personal beliefs got involved, because Anne Higgins, her mother, went through 18 pregnancies (with 11 live births) in 22 years before dying at the age of 49. Sanger was the sixth of eleven surviving children and spent much of her youth assisting with household chores and caring for her younger siblings. Margaret Sanger wanted to help, because when she traveled and met other women that went through frequent childbirth, miscarriages, and had self- induced abortions due to lack of unwanted pregnancies.

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