10356184 8 pages-Gun violence and gun control.docx - Surname 1 Name Instructor Course Date Gun violence and gun control Introduction The United States

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Surname 1 Name Instructor Course Date Gun violence and gun control Introduction The United States is ranked as the country with the highest number of privately-owned firearms in the world with a rate of 101 guns for every 100 people according to Jehan et al. (2018). The country also has one of the highest number of fatalities resulting from gun violence. For example, it is estimated that the country loses 32 lives on any given day as a result of firearm-related violence. In addition, 140 more are critically injured due to the same. In fact, Jehan et al. establish that in just 49 days, there are more people dying in the US as a result of gun violence than the total number of people who died in the Iraq War that lasted seven years. Yet, it is not just the deaths that the nation is worried about but the fact that it leads to the deaths of younger people and also puts a lot of pressure on the nation’s healthcare system (Jehan et al. 11). It therefore follows that gun violence not only leads to the death of potentially productive Americans, but also results in other social and economic impacts which all justify the need for stricter gun control policies. History of guns in the US In colonial America, guns were a common thing. They were used mainly for self- protection and hunting. During the American Revolutionary War, guns assumed new roles as they were used as weapons. Various laws existed to support private gun ownership. For example, the Connecticut of 1643 required adults to carry guns when going to public places like church. Ever since, the rights to own guns has been defended on the basis of self-protection. However, in the wake of high profile assassinations of 1960s and the mass shooting at the University of Texas, the government was prompted to enact a gun control law. The Gun Control Act of 1968 (GCA) was enacted by President Lyndon B. Johnson to regulate gun commerce between states (ProCon.org. 03). Since then, the US government under various leaderships have enacted various laws aimed at controlling gun ownership and use. A good example is the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act and Child Safety Lock Act of 20. The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017 came amid growing lobbying for gun rights with a section of people proposing for the reduction of control laws. The current situation in the US is such that after every incidence of mass shooting, proponents of gun control laws lobby on the basis of reducing mass shootings. Essentially, these lobbyists often cite the need for smarter gun laws built on background checks. Opponents of gun laws in the other hand argue that strengthening gun laws will not reduce mass shootings but will instead limit people’s access to self-protection. For example, a study by Pew Research Center in 2016 indicated that 52% of Americans wanted for the rights to own guns to be protected (ProCon.org. 08). While the entire matter has been overly politicized, it is up to the government
Surname 2 to realize the cost of firearm violence to the US population and to come up with smart gun laws that will ensure guns do not get in the wrong hands.

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