Synthesis of Magnesium Oxide Lab.docx - Brandon...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

Brandon Comiskey-Lucero Raymond Chem121L Sec 8 December 3, 2018 The Synthesis of Magnesium Oxide Introduction This experiment mainly covers a combustion of Magnesium Oxide. In doing this reaction, we get to directly learn how to determine compositions of our compound. We start by calibrating our crucible and lid, then go into cooking our magnesium. Using the taken masses of each step of the reaction, we are able to determine the mass Oxygen consumed, the mass percentage of each component, and even determine the empirical formula at the end. While doing all of this we also examined different properties of 4 different oxides, specifically their pH values. The oxides we used were composed of Calcium, Barium, Sulfur, and Phosphorus individually. Experimental Data To start off this experiment, we began by conducting an uncontrolled combustion of Magnesium. In this step, we simply took a small strip of Magnesium and held it over the bunsen burner and examined the characteristics as it burned. While we were not able to look directly at the resulting flame, we did record some interesting data. The Magnesium took a longer amount of time than expected to ignite.
Once placed above the flame, an orange glow increased gradually over the metal. Following this, we began to complete the addendum. The main point of this was to learn about the acid-base properties of the different Group A oxides. The first two oxides we tested were Calcium Oxide and Barium Oxide. In testing these, we created a solution of 50 mL of water and about four drops of phenolphthalein. Once we created this solution, we added a small amount of the oxides. The processes were separate for each but both shared very interesting characteristics.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture