cjt215 final paper.docx - Konczal 1 CJT215 Victimology...

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Konczal 1 CJT215 Victimology Michael J. Konczal July 14, 2018
Konczal 2 Rape, and other sexual violence, can have such a profound and long-lasting effect on the victim. Rape can be considered one of the most, if not the most, heinous crime that can be committed against another individual. The effects of rape can be both physically, mentally, or even psychological. Among these, the psychological effects can be some of the worst aftereffects a victim may deal with. It should be noted, however, that each victim will respond to the act of rape differently. No two cases of rape will ever be exactly the same. This can be attributed to several factors, such as the perpetrator’s relationship to the victim (known or unknown), the length of time of the rape, the extent of physical harm, the victim’s experience with social agencies following the rape (law enforcement, hospital, etc.), or even the victim’s family’s response to the rape occurrence (Boyd, 2011). All these factors listed above are not end-all-be-all for rape victims, rather they are merely normal responses that have been previously recorded in past rape occurrences. This paper will further discuss in more detailed these factors and impacts that rape occurrences have on the said victims. When it comes to psychological impact on victims, there is short-term psychological impact as well as longer-term psychological impact. During the attack, it is common for the victim to fear for their death and disassociate themselves. Also, just because the victim does not resist or becomes paralyzed by fear, it does not mean that they wanted the rape to take place. They may have decided that it was in their bets interest to simply not resist (Boyd, 2011).This fear is seen as an immediate impact, while in some cases it can last for up to a year (Petrak, 2002). Fears of future attacks may follow, and they victim may view the world as an unsafe place and untrustworthy. This is even more so if the perpetrator was an intimate partner (Crome & McCabe, 1995). For months or even years to come, the victim may experience
Konczal 3 feelings of low self-esteem, self-blame, and guilt. The victim can forget and deny aspects of the

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