P2 - Smith 1 Sam Smith Professor Otto English 1301 Angle of Vision Nuclear Power When you read an article in a magazine or a newspaper do you

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Smith Sam Smith Professor Otto English 1301 6-10-2007 Angle of Vision: Nuclear Power When you read an article in a magazine or a newspaper, do you entirely believe or support what the author of that article is saying? Often times the answer is no, and this is due to the obscure or biased angle of vision of that author. A writer’s “angle of vision” is his or her particular point of view on a certain subject. Every person possesses their own unique angle of vision. It is determined “by our life experiences and knowledge, by our class and gender, by our ethnicity and sexual orientation, by our personal beliefs and values, and by our ongoing intentions and desires” (Ramage, Bean, and Johnson 81). In this particular circumstance, two different authors pose completely dissimilar angles of vision regarding the continuation of the use of nuclear power in the United States. While the use of nuclear power can prove to be an effective source of energy, it does generate some threats with regard to the environment. However, with modern advances in technology, these risks are becoming less likely. In “Passage 1,” Vice President Dick Cheney and his Energy Task Force effectively advocate the prolongation of the use of nuclear energy in their article entitled “National Energy Policy: Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound Energy for America’s Future.” For the purpose of this essay we shall regard Cheney as the primary author of this document. “Passage 2” is an excerpt from an article entitled “Bush, Cheney Will Face Wall of Opposition If They Try to 1
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Smith Resurrect Nuclear Power,” which consists of columnist Marianne Means’ argument against the Bush administration’s policy for reviving the utilization of nuclear energy. Both authors effectively argue their views, but their angles of vision clearly contrast, due primarily to the manner in which they state their meaning or intentions directly, how they select or omit certain key details, how they use specific words to frame the subject to have a desired connotation, how they use figures of speech, and how they emphasize ideas through sentence structure. To fully understand this essay, there are few terms that might need to first be defined. As stated before, angle of vision is a person’s personal point of view on a subject. Bias is showing prejudice towards a certain subject. The American Heritage Dictionary defines “overt” as “open and observable.” A key tern when dealing with nuclear energy is “high-level nuclear waste.” “High-level wastes are a different matter.
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2008 for the course ENGL 1301 taught by Professor Purcell during the Spring '07 term at Texas A&M.

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P2 - Smith 1 Sam Smith Professor Otto English 1301 Angle of Vision Nuclear Power When you read an article in a magazine or a newspaper do you

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