Water by the Spoonful Research Paper.docx - Do 1 Denis Do Instructor Alvarez ENG 1B Internal Struggles Much time has passed since Virginia Woolf

Water by the Spoonful Research Paper.docx - Do 1 Denis Do...

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Do 1 Denis Do Instructor Alvarez ENG 1B November 24, 2018 Internal Struggles Much time has passed since Virginia Woolf lectured at Girton and Newnham colleges on the topic of fiction and women. Her noteworthy words are well-preserved for future cohorts of women in her essay, “ A Room of One's Own ”. This essay is the "first manifesto of the modern feminist movement" and has been christened "a notable preamble to a kind of feminine Declaration of Independence" (Muller 34). Woolf writes that her reasonable objective for this revolutionary composition is to "encourage the young women--they seem to get fearfully depressed" (Gordon). This essay on the history of women's literatures, explanations for the shortage of famous female artists, and propositions for future writers to achieve more than simple encouragement and inspiration for fledgling writers. Woolf doubts the "effect ... poverty [has] on fiction" and the "conditions … necessary for the creation of works of art", and she convincingly contends that economics are as significant as aptitude and motivation in artistic practices. She unequivocally declares and, with dazzling fiction, backs her notion that every woman "must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction" (4). Woolf's clever and stunningly constructed essay has a useful message for aspiring female writers: as forerunners in the nearly uncharted frontline of women's literature, and to make ageless, influential works of art, they must desert the well-known customs of mannish creativity and shape their own customs and styles. Woolf presents this fresh literary convention through the configuration of her lecture. Instead of following the traditional layout established through ages of male lecturing, she
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Do 2 "transform[s] the formidable lecture form into an intimate conversation among female equals" (Marcus, "Still" 79). She maintains this familiarity in the written essay, too. Quentin Bell, Woolf's nephew and biographer, writes that "in A Room of One's Own one hears Virginia speaking ...she gets very close to her conversational style" (144). Instead of submitting her readers to the typical "dictation of the expert to the ignorant,” Woolf involves her audience in her quest for answers (Marcus, “Virginia” 145). She warns them that she intends to "make use of all the liberties and licenses of a novelist," that her fiction is "likely to contain more truth than fact," and that they must "seek out this truth and … decide whether any part of it is worth keeping" (4-5). She does not reveal "the truth as she sees it"; instead, she obliges the readers to "participate in the drama of asking questions and searching for Woolf's creative departure from established lecture style delightfully foreshadows her intent to generate entirely new feminine traditions and searching for answers" (Marcus, Virginia 145).
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