Case Study 4.docx - PSC 129 Prof Schaefer Case Study 4 The Oklahoma City Bombing One hundred sixty-eight people twenty-one of those children passed away

Case Study 4.docx - PSC 129 Prof Schaefer Case Study 4 The...

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PSC 129Prof. SchaeferCase Study 4The Oklahoma City BombingOne hundred sixty-eight people, twenty-one of those children, passed away in the massive collapse of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. A Ryder truck containing approximately seven thousand pounds of explosives detonated at 9:01am. Five hundred and nine people suffered from massive injuries. Timothy McVeigh, the bomber, was twenty-six years old. He was less than two blocks away from the site of the attack. McVeigh drove the opposite direction from the bombing in a yellow Mercury. By 11am, McVeigh was pulled over by a Kansas state trooper for four misdemeanor offenses such as a missing license plate, and a concealed weapon without a permit. The Noble County Jail did not realize they had the Oklahoma City bomber in their possession. McVeigh fit the profile of the FBI’s Behavioral Science Unit’s Special Agent Clinton Zandt. The profile was “You’re going to have a white male,acting alone or with one other person. He’ll be in his mid-twenties. He’ll have military experience and be a fringe member of some militia group. He’ll be angry at the government for what happened at Ruby Ridge and Waco.” 1Terrorism is the unlawful use of violence to create harm and fear to others for some type of goal. In my view, the Oklahoma bombing was a crime of terrorism because McVeigh inflicted fear on the people of the city and multiple casualties. These crimes are different from other acts of mass murder. Mass murderers usually do not have a vendetta when they kill, they usually just pick random people. When a terrorist commits a crime, there is usually a political agenda behind
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their crime. They usually believe that their crime serves a purpose for their religion or political belief. These attacks are usually committed for personal gain. “Terrorists are committed to an ideology, or set of beliefs, that form the rationale for the crime; they are not committing these crimes to put money in their pockets.”1In the case UnitedStates v. Timothy J. McVeigh, the criminal justice system handled it successfully. The prosecutor had enough evidence to go in front of the grand jury and convince them to hand down an indictment against McVeigh and his co-conspirator Terry Nichols. The
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