5 Habits of Highly Effective Communicators - - The Buffer Blog.pdf

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5 Habits of Highly Effective CommunicatorsHave you ever walked away from talking with someone that you’ve just met and thought to yourself“Wow, this was one of the best conversations I’ve ever had!”? I’ve recently had one of those andat first I quite selfishly concluded “Wow, I’m a great communicator”. But then I realized, hang on asecond, I think this other person was the reason I felt so good about this talk, how did he do that?I started to think about a few of the things this person did, that made me feel so comfortable and open tospeak with him. In usual Buffer blog manner, I thought of finding some real science to back up some of thesimple habits this newly found friend had so ingrained when talking with me.So what I’ve come up with are 5 of the most effective habits famous communicators have used forhundreds of years. Recently some new science studies have backed up their claims and I feel it makes for avery compelling case to overhaul my own communication efforts and maybe it’s some inspiration for youtoo!Let’s dig in:1. They listen first – then focus on being Active and ConstructiveThe word conversation generally brings to mind talking—at least for me. However, if you’ve ever seen twopeople trying to talk to each other at the same time, you’ll know that listening is just as important. In fact,listening is half of a successful conversation—you take turns to talk, and everyone feels heard. This is greatcommunication.
You might have heard of active listening before. It’s something we often get confused with passive, silentlistening. Active listening, in fact, means taking part in the conversation and working on the rapportbetween you and your partner. It’smade up of three parts: paraphrasing, inquiry and acknowledgement.Stephen Covey’s bookThe 7 Habits of Highly Effective Peopleis also a great one to read for tips onimproving your listening skills (and, in fact, how you build relationships in general). Stephen’s advicestresses the importance of being nonjudgmental and not making assumptions when listening to others. Healso talks about empathic listening—understanding your conversation partner fully, rather than seeingwhat they talk about through your own point of view.Thisoverview of Stephen’s chapter on listeningbreaks down the five types of listening he explains:Ignoring – The “La La La, I can’t hear you” fingers in the ears school of listeningPretending – The “Uh huh, Oh really? That’s nice” school of listeningSelective Hearing – The “But I’m sure I heard you say…” school of listeningAttentive – The “I know exactly how you feel, when that happened to me…” school of listeningEmpathic – The “And how does that make you feel*?” school of listening

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Term
Spring
Professor
CHADT.ELLINGSWORTH
Tags
It, partner, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,

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