Week 2 Discussion.docx - Week 2 Discussion Diversity and Health Assessments MR 23-year-old Native American Personal Experiences with Cultural

Week 2 Discussion.docx - Week 2 Discussion Diversity and...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 11 pages.

Week 2 Discussion Diversity and Health Assessments: MR, 23-year-old Native American Personal Experiences with Cultural Sensitivity Both patients and health-care workers can be confused and have concerns about providing faith-based or naturalistic care, and we as Nurse Practitioners need to be aware of and respect the special beliefs of other cultures (Ball, Dains, Flynn, Solomon, & Stewart, 2015, Ch. 2, p. 27). In my personal experience at Riley Children’s Hospital, we experienced mothers who would breast feed children way beyond nutritional value, and some cultures believed this to be more of a bonding and comforting experience. We had a large population of the Japanese-Chinn community in Indianapolis who practiced this until the child was no longer interested, which I had seen as old as an eight-year-old boy. Another practice of the Japanese-Chinn families I worked with was that the children wore shoes to bed, and although odd to me, it was completely normal for them, so out of respect we did not mention it and simply let the family practice their routine. We had Caucasian Americans practice breast feeding for the bonding, comforting experience, as one mother breast fed her 14-year-old daughter and another mother breastfed her 17-year-old son. These were issues discussed with social services and physicians, however I am not aware of any consequences for the families. Cultural Factors Affecting Native Americans American Indian communities experience high rates of alcohol-related problems and have responded by implementing prevention and treatment programs, as tribes are assuming greater authority over their own economic, social, educational, and health issues (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2018). One of the most powerful and effective solutions can come through traditional Indian values and beliefs, when combined with consistent care and support from the healthcare community and social support systems within Indian communities, this can hopefully lead to a substantial reduction in alcohol-related problems (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2018). Native Americans have some of the highest rates of alcohol and drug abuse among minority groups, and certain factors may contribute to the development of alcohol use disorders among Native Americans as well as prevent them from seeking help including economic issues, cultural loss, domestic abuse, and physical and mental health issues may put Native Americans at higher risk of alcoholism (Guarnatta, 2018). Native Americans have high rates of unemployment and low rates of high school and college completion, they are less likely to have medical insurance and access to healthcare, and poor education, poverty, and limited resources may contribute to alcoholism (Guarnatta, 2018). Native American culture was significantly threatened after Europeans colonized the United States. Some sources speculate that the brutality and loss experienced by Native Americans, including loss of family members and tribes, land, and traditions, led to historical trauma, which has been transmitted across
Image of page 1
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 11 pages?

  • Summer '15
  • Native Americans in the United States

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture