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Teacher Labor Markets in Developed Countries - ProQuest.pdf...

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Back to results More like this Abstract Translate Full Text Translate Turn on search term navigation Hide highlighting Summary Summary Helen Ladd takes a comparative look at policies that the world's industrialized countries are using to assure a supply of high-quality teachers teachers. Her survey puts U.S. educational policies and practices into international perspective. Ladd begins by examining teacher teacher salaries salaries--an obvious, but costly, policy tool. She fi nds, perhaps surprisingly, that students in countries with high teacher teacher salaries salaries do not in general perform better on international tests than those in countries with lower lower salaries salaries. Ladd does fi nd, however, that the share of MoreMore Summary Summary Helen Ladd takes a comparative look at policies that the world's industrialized countries are using to assure a supply of high-quality teachers teachers. Her survey puts U.S. educational policies and practices into international perspective. Ladd begins by examining teacher teacher salaries salaries--an obvious, but costly, policy tool. She fi nds, perhaps surprisingly, that students in countries with high teacher teacher salaries salaries do not in general perform better on international tests than those in countries with lower lower salaries salaries. Ladd does fi nd, however, that the share of underquali fi ed teachers teachers in a country is closely related to salary salary. In high-salary salary countries like Germany, Japan, and Korea, for example, only 4 percent of teachers teachers are underquali fi ed, as against more than 10 percent in the United States, where teacher teacher salaries salaries, Ladd notes, are low low relative to those in other industrialized countries. 1 + Teacher Labor Markets in Developed Countries Ladd, Helen F. The Future of Children The Future of Children; Princeton ; Princeton Vol. 17, Iss. 1, (Spring 2007). DOI:10.1353/foc.2007.0006 Full text Full text - PDF Abstract/Details
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Teacher Teacher shortages also appear to stem from policies that make salaries salaries uniform across academic subject areas and across geographic regions. Shortages are especially common in math and science, in large cities, and in rural areas. Among the policy strategies proposed to deal with such shortages is to pay teachers teachers different salaries salaries according to their subject area. Many countries are also experimenting with fi nancial incentive packages, including bonuses and loans, for teachers teachers in speci fi c subjects or geographic areas. Ladd notes that many developed countries are trying to attract teachers teachers by providing alternative routes into teaching, often through special programs in traditional teacher teacher training institutions and through adult education or distance learning programs. To reduce attrition among new teachers teachers, many developed countries have also been using formal induction or mentoring programs as a way to improve new teachers teachers' chances of success.
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