Elimination of pre-dominant frequency from speech signal .pdf

Elimination of pre-dominant frequency from speech signal .pdf

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Elimination of pre-dominant frequency in speech signal 1 KLUNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRONICS AND COMMUNICTION ENGINEERING ABSTRACT: In this project it is desired to perform frequency analysis on the two speech recordings. Specifically, it is required to compute and display the spectrum of one segment of each of your two signals. Record ourself by saying `yes' and `no' and create a wav files. The recordings should be at 8000 samples per second.Using MATLAB. Extract a 50 millisecond segment of voiced speech from your `yes'signal. You should select the segment during the `e' sound of `yes'.The segment should be roughly periodic.Compute and display the spectrum (DTFT) of your 50 millisecond speech segment. Repeat same for your `no' signal.Based on the spectra that you compute what is the pitch frequency of your speech? (The pitch frequency is the fundamental frequency of the quasi-periodic voiced speech signal.). Plot the pole-zero diagram of your filter in Matlab. Verify that the poles and zero match where they were designed to be. Plot the frequency response magnitude of your filter |[Hf]| versus physical frequency. Plot the impulse response h[n]of your filter. You can create an impulse signal and then use the Matlab command filter to apply your filter to the impulse signal. Apply your filter to your speech signal Extract a short segment of your speech signal before and after filtering. Plot both the original speech waveform x[n]and filtered speech waveform y[n]. Also plot the difference between these two waveforms d[n] = y(n) -x[n]. Objectives (a) Generate and display plot of speech signals in time domain. (b)Design a notch filter to eliminate the pre-dominant frequency components. (c)Compute and display the spectrum of these signals .
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Elimination of pre-dominant frequency in speech signal 2 KLUNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRONICS AND COMMUNICTION ENGINEERING CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Basic Theory: Speech is an acoustic signal produced from a speech production system. From our understanding of signals and systems, the system characteristics depend on the design of the system. For the case of linear time invariant system, this is completely characterized in terms of its impulse response. However, the nature of response depends on the type of input excitation to the system. For instance, we have impulse response, step response, sinusoidal response and so on for a given system. Each of these output responses are used to understand the behavior of the system under different conditions. A similar phenomenon happens in the production of speech also. Based on the input excitation phenomenon, the speech production can be broadly categorized into three activities. The first case where the input excitation is nearly periodic in nature, the second case where the input excitation is random noise-like in nature and third case where there is no excitation to the system.
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Christopher Reinemann
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