Chapter13Transparencies

Chapter13Transparencies - CHAPTER 13 EMOTIONS I THEORIES OF...

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I – THEORIES OF EMOTION Emotion : A response of the whole organism, involving (1) physiological arousal, (2) expressive behaviors, and (3) conscious experience. 1 st Controversy : Which comes first – physiological or psychological (emotional experiences)? James-Lange theory : The experience of emotion is an awareness of physiological responses to emotion-arousing stimuli (assumes different physiological states for different emotions- supported by recent evidence). Suggests that emotions can be changed by behaving difference (also supported by recent evidence). Cannon-Bard theory : Emotion-arousing stimulus simultaneously triggers (1) physiological responses and (2) the subjective experience of emotion. Physiology alone is not enough. 2 nd Controversy : What is the relationship between feeling and thinking (emotion and cognition)? Schacter’s two-factor theory : To experience emotion one must (1) be physically aroused and (2) cognitively label the arousal (assumes same physiological state for all emotions). Emotion may occur before cognition – pathways from eyes and ears bypass cortex and go, by way of the thalamus, to the amygdala– the emotion control center. Speeds responses to threatening stimuli. Cortex gets involved later. Amygdala sends more neural projections to the cortex than it receives back - easier for feelings to hijack thinking than for thinking to rule feelings. Highly emotional people are so because of their interpretations . They personalize events as being somehow directed at them, and they generalize their experiences by blowing single incidents out of proportion. Summary : Some emotional responses-especially simple likes, dislikes, and fears-involve no conscious thinking (i.e., difficult to alter by changing thinking).Other emotions- including moods such as depression and complex feelings such as hatred and love-are greatly affected by our interpretations, memories, and expectations. Two dimensions of emotion
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Chapter13Transparencies - CHAPTER 13 EMOTIONS I THEORIES OF...

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