2018-307outline-fall-ver1.docx - Faculty of Science...

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Unformatted text preview: Faculty of Science Department of Chemistry and Biology Land Acknowledgement Toronto is in the 'Dish With One Spoon Territory’. The Dish With One Spoon is a treaty between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas and Haudenosaunee that bound them to share the territory and protect the land. Subsequent Indigenous Nations and peoples, Europeans and all newcomers have been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship and respect. BLG 307 Molecular Biology Fall 2018 Instructor: Kim Gilbride Dept. of Chemistry and Biology, Ryerson University Office: KHN312 Tel: 416-979-5000, ext 6354 Office Hours: Posted on Office door Email: [email protected] Calendar Description: This course emphasizes the fundamentals of molecular biology including gene structure and function, regulation of transcription and translation, gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and recombinant DNA technology including DNA mutagenesis, protein engineering and monoclonal antibody technology. Prerequisites: BLG 151 and (CHY 261 or BCH 261) and BLG 400 Duration and Location: Lecture: 3 hrs/week, Thursday 8-10am (DSQ10) and Friday 1-2pm (ENG103) Compulsory Textbook: Lewin’s GENES XII, by J.E. Krebs, E.S. Goldstein and S.T. Kilpatrick, Jones and Bartlett Learning, ISBN: 9781284104493 Learning Objectives: 1 This course will focus on underlying principles in molecular biology. At the end of this course, students: 1. Should be able to describe DNA, RNA and protein structure 2. Should be able to list and explain the various functions of DNA, RNA and protein in the cell 3. Should understand the chemical and physical properties involved in DNA/RNA/Protein interactions and the consequences of mutations on these interactions 4. Should be able to discuss and interpret gene expression 5. Should understand the theory behind the methodologies used in molecular biology and biotechnology and explain the importance of controls in experimentation 6. Should be able to design experiments to solve basic molecular biology questions 7. Should be able to apply their knowledge to real world problem where molecular biology principles can be used Course Evaluation: 3 Group tests (10% each) 1 Mid-term 1 Final exam Total 30 % 25 % 45 % 100 % COURSE SYNOPSIS for Lectures: Material covered during the lectures will be drawn from chapters listed in the table from the required textbook. Not all chapters will be covered in the same detail and it is the responsibility of each student to attend class and note which sections from each chapter are, or are not, being covered. Tests and exam questions will be drawn from the overlap between material covered in class and material in the textbook or in hand-outs. For some chapters, only an overview will be covered. In-class quizzes, midterm test and final exam will contain an array of multiple-choice, short answer and problem questions. Grades for mid-term exams will be posted on D2L within 3 weeks of the examination date. Grading requirements Final grades will be determined using the performance designations for the Faculty of Science found in the Ryerson University Undergraduate Program Calendar. To pass this course you have to get at least 50% of the total course marks. Communication with Students: Students are required to inform their instructors of any situation which arises during the semester in a timely fashion which may have an adverse effect upon their academic performance, and must request any considerations and accommodations according to the relevant policies and well in advance. Failure to do so will jeopardize any academic appeals. Ryerson’s email policy states that only Ryerson email accounts are to be used for communication with students. All students, including continuing education students, have access to Ryerson email through their my.ryerson.ca site, and this is the official way in which they receive communication. All students are required to register for and maintain this account. Emails sent from other accounts may not be answered! 2 Missed Evaluations: Students are required to inform their instructors of any situation which arises during the semester which may have an adverse effect upon their academic performance, and must request any considerations and accommodations according to the relevant policies and well in advance. Failure to do so will jeopardize any academic appeals. If you are sick on the day of an evaluation you MUST inform the instructor that same day by email to be considered for an accommodation. ● Medical certificates – If a student misses the deadline for submitting an assignment, or the date of an exam or other evaluation component because of illness, he or she must submit a Ryerson Student Medical Certificate AND an Academic Consideration form within 3 working days of the missed date. Both documents are available at . If you are a full time or part time degree student, then you submit your forms to your own program department or school. If you are a certificate or non-certificate student, then you submit your forms to the staff at the front desk of the Chang School. ● Religious observance – If a student needs accommodation because of religious observance, he or she must submit a Request for Accommodation of Student Religious, Aboriginal and Spiritual Observance AND an Academic Consideration form within the first 2 weeks of the class or, for a final examination, within 2 weeks of the posting of the examination schedule. If the required absence occurs within the first 2 weeks of classes, or the dates are not known well in advance as they are linked to other conditions, these forms should be submitted with as much lead time as possible in advance of the required absence. Both documents are available at . If you are a full time or part time degree student, then you submit the forms to your own program department or school. If you are a certificate or non-certificate student, then you submit the forms to the staff at the front desk of the Chang School. ● Academic Consideration - Students who need academic accommodation support should register with the Academic Accommodation Support office (formerly called the Access Centre). In the first 2 weeks of class, registered students should inform their instructors through an “Accommodation Form for Professors” that they are registered with Academic Accommodation Support and what accommodations are required. Academic Policies: a. Ryerson Policies of Interest Ryerson Senate Policies - Ryerson Academic Integrity Policy 46 - Undergraduate Grading, Promotion and Academic Standing Policy 60 - Student Code of Academic Conducthttp:// Policy 61 - Student Code of Non-academic Conducthttp:// Policy 134 - Undergraduate Academic Consideration and Appeals Policy 135 - Examination Policy Policy 150 - Accommodation of Student Religious Observance Obligations Policy 157 - Student Email Accounts for Official University Communication 3 b. Obligations – Students need to inform faculty of any situation arising during the semester which may have an adverse effect upon their academic performance; they must request any necessary considerations (e.g. medical or compassionate), or accommodations [e.g. religious observance, disability (should be registered with the Access Center), etc.] according to policies and well in advance. Failure to do so will jeopardize any academic appeals. c. Re-grading and Re-calculation – Must be requested within 10 working days of the return of the graded assignment to the class. Academic Conduct: In order to create an environment conducive to learning and respectful of others’ rights, phones and pagers must be silenced during lectures, lab sessions and evaluations. Students should refrain from disrupting the lectures by arriving late and/or leaving the classroom before the lecture is finished. Academic Misconduct: According to the Ryerson policy 60 ( ), academic misconduct includes, but not limited to: ▪ Plagiarism which is the claiming of words, ideas, artistry, drawings or data of another person. This also includes submitting your own work in whole or in part for credit in two or more courses. ▪ Cheating ▪ Misrepresentation of personal identity or performance ▪ Submission of false information ▪ Contributing to academic misconduct ▪ Damaging, tampering, or interfering with the scholarly environment ▪ Unauthorized copying or use of copyrighted materials ▪ Violations of departmental policies or professional behavior ▪ Violations of specific departmental or course requirements Committing academic misconduct will trigger academic penalties, including failing grades, suspension and possibly expulsion from the University. As a Ryerson student, you are responsible for familiarizing yourself with Ryerson conduct policies. Non Academic Conduct: Among many other infractions, the code specifically refers to the following as a violation: “Disruption of Learning and Teaching - Students shall not behave in disruptive ways that obstruct the learning and teaching environment”. Diversity and Inclusion Statement In this course I would like to create a learning environment that supports a diversity of thoughts, perspectives and experiences, and honors your identities (including race, gender, class, sexuality, religion, ability, etc.) For more information about our University’s resources and services on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion please visit 4 Course Schedule Week 1 Dates Sept 6 Subject Course outline – What is Molecular Biology? The central dogma Chapters 1+ 1 Sept 7 Mutations as a means to alter genetic information 1+ 2 Sept 13 The gene 3+ Sept 14 The genome 4 3 Thursday, Sept 20, 9-10am 1st group test 1, 3, 4 3 4 5 6 7 Sept 21 Sept 27/28 Oct 4/5 Oct 11/12 Thursday, Oct 18 8-10am Intro to methods Methods to study molecular biology Prokaryotic transcription Reading week Mid-term 2+ 2+ 17 7 Oct 19 Eukaryotic transcription 18 8 9 Oct 26 Nov 1 RNA splicing Gene expression 19 22 9 Friday, Nov 2 11-12pm 2nd group test 2, 17, 18, 22 10 Nov 9 The genetic code 23 10 Nov 10 Gene regulation in prokaryotes 24 11 Nov 17 The operon in bacteria 24 + 11 12 Nov 18 Nov 22 Phage regulation Gene regulation in eukaryotes 25 + 26 + 12 3rd group test 23,24,25,26 13 Friday, Nov 23 11-12pm Nov 29 Epigenetics 28 13 14/15 Nov 30 TBA Noncoding RNA Final exam 1,2, 3,4,17 29 All chapters listed + any additional information talked about in class 5 ...
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