CHAP02.PDF - Western Asia and Egypt 3500\u2013500B.C Key Events As you read look for the key events in the history of Southwest Asia and Egypt \u2022 The

CHAP02.PDF - Western Asia and Egypt 3500u2013500B.C Key...

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34 Western Asia and Egypt 3500–500 B . C . Key Events As you read, look for the key events in the history of Southwest Asia and Egypt. The Sumerians in Mesopotamia were among the first groups to build a civilization, and they were the first to develop a system of writing. Due in large part to the Nile, early Egyptian civilization was stable and prosperous. Massive monuments, the pyramids, were built to honor the deaths of the pharaohs. The Israelites emerged as a distinct people. Of the other empires that came into being in Southwest Asia, the longest lasting and most powerful were the Assyrian and the Persian Empires. The Impact Today The events that occurred during this time period still impact our lives today. The peoples of Mesopotamia and Egypt built cities and struggled with the problems of organized government. The Israelites developed a major world religion, which influenced the development of Christianity and Islam, and has a continuing effect on Western civilization. World History Video The Chapter 2 video, “Egypt,” chronicles the rise of Egyptian civilization. 3000 B . C . Sumerian cities emerge in southern Mesopotamia 3000 B . C . Cuneiform writing invented 2700 B . C . Old Kingdom begins 2540 B . C . Great Pyramid of King Khufu finished 1792 B . C . Hammurabi comes to power 1652 B . C . Middle Kingdom ends 1567 B . C . New Kingdom begins 3000 B . C . 2700 B . C . 2400 B . C . 2100 B . C . 1800 B . C . 1500 B . C . Sumerian cuneiform script Hammurabi established a code of law.
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970 B . C . First temple built in Jerusalem 539 B . C . Babylonia falls 521 B . C . Darius begins to expand Persian Empire 1200 B . C . 900 B . C . 600 B . C . 300 B . C . 100 B . C . 50 B . C . Death mask of King Tutankhamen of Egypt King Solomon’s temple in Jerusalem HISTORY Chapter Overview Visit the Glencoe World History Web site at and click on Chapter 2–Chapter Overview to preview chapter information. wh.glencoe.com The Great Sphinx and the Great Pyramids at Giza, Egypt, symbolize the power and longevity of Egyptian 35
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36 n the winter of 1849, a daring young Englishman made adifficult journey into the deserts and swamps of southernIraq. He moved south down the banks of the river Euphrateswhile braving high winds and temperatures that reached 120degrees Fahrenheit (48.9° C). The man, William Loftus, led asmall expedition in search of the roots of civilization. As hesaid, “From our childhood we have been led to regard thisplace as the cradle of the human race.”Guided by native Arabs into the southernmost reaches ofIraq, Loftus and his small group of explorers were soon over-whelmed by what they saw. He wrote, “I know of nothingmore exciting or impressive than the first sight of one of thesegreat piles, looming in solitary grandeur from the surround-ing plains and marshes.”One of these “piles” was known to the natives as themound of Warka. The mound contained the ruins of theancient city of Uruk, one of the first real cities in the worldand part of one of the world’s first civilizations. SouthernIraq, known to ancient peoples as Mesopotamia, was one of four areas in the world where civilization began.I
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