Week 7 Main Question Post NURS 6521 Pharm.docx - MAIN QUESTION POST Patient HL has come in to the clinic with nausea vomiting and diarrhea HL has a

Week 7 Main Question Post NURS 6521 Pharm.docx - MAIN...

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MAIN QUESTION POST Patient HL has come in to the clinic with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. HL has a history of drug abuse and possible Hepatitis C. The patient currently takes the following drugs: -Synthroid 100 mcg daily -Nifedipine 30 mg daily -Prednisone 10 mg daily Review of Current Medication Regimen Levothyroxine is a synthetic version of thyroxine. It acts like a thyroxine; in the liver and kidneys it is converted to T3, which is an active metabolite (Drugbank, n.d.). T3 attaches to thyroid binding proteins and is then transported to the cytoplasm and nucleus. (Drugbank, n.d.). Levothyroxine is absorbed mainly through the gastrointestinal system, metabolized mainly by the liver and excreted by the kidneys (Drugbank, n.d.). Levothyroxine should be taken 30-60 minutes before breakfast. Common side effects include fever, hot flashes, sensitivity to heat, sweating, headache, nervousness, irritability, nausea, insomnia, temporary hair loss, changes in menstrual periods, and changes in appetite or weight (Arcangelo, Peterson, Wilbur, & Reinhold, 2017). Nifedipine is a calcium channel blocker, typically used to treat hypertension, by acting on vascular smooth muscle cells to prevent calcium-dependent contraction and vasoconstriction (Arcangelo et al., 2017). Starting dosage is typically 30 mg daily. Some of the adverse effects
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