Movie Review of Hip Hop Evolution.docx - By: Orlando Brown...

Doc Preview
Pages 5
Total views 99
By: Orlando Brown Hip Hop Evolution By Darby Wheeler Movie Review The Netflix documentaryHip Hop Evolution, in my opinion, one of the most informative series about the timeline of hip hop and its roots. It goes through numerous interviews with some of hip hop’s most influential artists and MC’s. This book review will go through each episode and provide an overview of the evolution of hip hop. Although many people believed rap was a relatively new concept of music, it actually started back in the 30s with artists like Pigmeat Markham. He was the first person who started rapping over beats and instruments. Fast forward to the time right before rap started to evolve, disco was the big musical sensation that everyone enjoyed and consumed. It was highly glorified in New York because of the materialistic mindsets the community had during the 60s. The big furs and jewelry were the things people loved, but in reality the Bronx was burning (literally). It was the most prone area to fires in the US. There were miles of abandoned buildings and empty fields. Out of all the hardship and turbulence was the birth of hip hop. It started with one party that was thrown in West Bronx by DJ Kool Herc. This party was considered to be the first hip hop party. The distinct features of this party was they only played the breakdown sections of each song. This is where B-boys came from. They were called the break boys, b-boys for short, but they were the flashy dancers that were seen at every party back in the premature days of hip hop. Along with Kool Herc was a guy named Co La Rock. He was the first “hype man” as I would like to call it. He was the first person who used his voice to get the crowd more hype during parties. Kind of like what we see DJ Khaled do today. Someone who never raps on the songs, but gets the crowd deeper into the music. Co La Rock laid the foundation for what would be known as “MC’ing”. Afrika Bambaataa was from South Bronx and wanted to take DJ Kool Herc’s musical ideas back to his side of town. His goal was to change the environment because gangs were killing each other. In the midst of bringing everyone together, was the birth of Zulu nation. Zulu nation was a hip hop awareness group that promoted peace, love, unity, and having fun for those in the ghetto in the late 70s. During this time hip hop was still in a very raw form, but then came along Grandmaster Flash, one of hip hop’s most unique and influential figures. He focused on playing the technology and not musical instruments. He was the person who made the turntable into a musical instrument. While Flash was on the come-up, there was a “high-brow” artist named DJ Hollywood. He was the first hip hop icon with all the cars, clothes, and women. His music was considered disco because it had that type of feel to it and it wasn’t relatable to the community in anyway. Flash seen this and wanted more, so he partnered with a few other local MCs and formed the Furious Five. They were the first people who mixed the DJs with the MC’s. They would quickly become
Course Hero Badge

Want to read all 5 pages?

Previewing 2 of 5 pages Upload your study docs or become a member.
Course Hero Badge

Want to read all 5 pages?

Previewing 2 of 5 pages Upload your study docs or become a member.
Course Hero Badge

End of preview

Want to read all 5 pages? Upload your study docs or become a member.