Discussion Post 8.docx - Post an explanation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disorder and irritable bowel syndrome including

Discussion Post 8.docx - Post an explanation of the...

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Post an explanation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disorder and irritable bowel syndrome, including similarities and differences. Then describe common treatments, addressing whether treatments for one disorder would work for the other disorder. Finally, explain how the patient factor you selected might impact the pathophysiology of and treatments for each disorder. Inflammatory Bowel Disorder Inflammatory bowel disorder (IBD) can be further broken down to two disorders, ulcerative colitis and crohn disease. Both are inflammatory disorders that could be caused by genes, environment, alterations in epithelial cell barrier functions, or altered immune responses (Huether & McCance, 2017). IBD is marked by intermittent episodes of mucopurulent bloody diarrhea in which the cultures are negative for known microbial pathogens (Hammer & McPhee, 2014). Ulcerative colitis disorder involves mainly the large colon and is classified with ulcerations in the mucosa layer on the left side of the intestines while crohns disease can affect the entire intestinal wall of the whole gastrointestinal tract (Laureate Education, 2012). Both forms of IBD have symptoms such as malabsorption, malnutrition, and bloody diarrhea (Hammer & McPhee, 2014). Figuring out which form of IBD a patient has can be difficult to diagnose due to both having similar signs and symptoms (Huether & McCance, 2017). It is vital the advanced nurse practitioner is able to differentiate between the two forms by where they occur within the gastro intestinal tract and how much of the intestinal wall is affected. Ulcerative Colitis In ulcerative colitis symptoms are usually mild and an individual may only be subjected to one or two episodes occurring in a lifetime (Hammer & McPhee, 2014). The process begins in the large intestines at the base of Lieberkuhn with a primary lesion, small erosions form into ulcers in the mucosa causing necrosis and abscess to form (Huether & McCance, 2017). The cramping pain, bleeding and urge to pass stool is caused by the mucosal destruction and
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inflammation (Huether & McCance, 2017).
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  • Spring '15
  • Gastroenterology, Irritable bowel syndrome, Ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, Huether

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