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Ethnographic ComparisonsEthnographic ComparisonsHUM215 Diversity and World CulturesLisa Bowe Rachelle MaloneArgosy University
Ethnographic Comparisons2Introduction:The two societies I selected to analyze is the Cherokee and the Indian cultures. I will bediscussing the human culture aspect of domestic life and kinship. This aspect is important toanthropology due to the fact, it studies these cultures on a domestic level. It studies where andhow families live together in these different cultures. It also shows how their children learn, whatthey are taught to believe in, and even what they are allowed to wear or dress like. Kinship looksat the relationship based on or modelled on the culturally recognized connection between parentsand children (and extended to siblings and through parents to more distant relatives.) It is thesocial recognition and expression of genealogical relationships. Kinship is not only actual butmay be based on supposed ties of blood.The Cherokee Indians were on of the largest five native American tribes who settled inthe American southeast portion of the United States. The tribe came from the Iroquolan descent.They have several sections to their tribes with each section led by a chief. They are highlyreligious and spiritually. Around the 1800's they began to adopt the culture of the white man helping them withtheir farming, building methods and even clothing. They lived in cabins made of logs instead oftee-pees. In 1828 gold was discovered on Cherokee land. This lead to the overtaking of theirhomes and they were forced out. This marked the origin of the trail of tears. About fourthousand, of the seventeen thousand Cherokee, lost their lives due to this journey to a reservationin Oklahoma. Today the largest part of Cherokee lives in Oklahoma. Some Cherokee tribes that are stillrecognized live in Georgia, Missouri, Alabama, Tennessee, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and
Ethnographic Comparisons3Mississippi. Within the family, Native American children learned cultural and societal values.While the tribal groups varied in their traditional child-rearing beliefs and practices, NativeAmerican children modeled and imitated the behaviors of important people in their lives. In theextended family network, which was the foundation of tribal societies, many people other thanbiological relatives were included in child rearing. In tribal societies, children were valued

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