PSYC 213 Lecture 5 \u2013 Visual Perception- Context and Theories.docx - Lecture 5 \u2013 Visual Perception Context and Theories Last Class Sensation versus

PSYC 213 Lecture 5 – Visual Perception- Context and Theories.docx

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 16 pages.

Lecture 5 – Visual Perception: Context and Theories Last Class: Sensation versus Perception Sensation – o Occurs in the sensory organs. o Energy from a physical stimulus in the environment that is picked up by sense organs. Light, sound, smell, etc. Translates this into some sort of neural impulse or signal. Perception – o Follows sensation. o When the brain organizes sensed information (organizes those impulses), and translates it/interprets it as something meaningful. Perception – understanding what is around us. McGurk Effect and the Brain We talked about how different senses might interact… People perceive speech as what they see… Compared brain activity for people who experienced the McGurk effect and those people who did not experience this effect. The left superior temporal sulcus is important for audiovisual integration during speech perception. o More active for people who experienced the McGurk effect. Region is important for integrating senses – so if it is activated more, coupling audiovisual information more tightly that someone who is less susceptible – more influenced by the McGurk effect. Underlying neuromechanisms for this effect. o Individual differences are seen in the brain! How we take in information is represented in the brain. From the Eyes… Early visual system – o Step 1 – Light waves enter the eye and are focused on the retina, a thin layer of tissue at the back of the eye. o Step 2 – Photoreceptors in the retina (rods and cones) convert light to electrical activity. Rods – dim light visions. Cones – colour and detail. o Step 3 – This electrical signal is sent to bipolar cells then onto ganglion cells.
Image of page 1
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 16 pages?

  • Winter '08
  • LEVITIN
  • Associative Visual Agnosia,  Light

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture