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ed psych paper - Laura Miller Ed Psych 301 March 8 2006...

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Laura Miller Ed Psych 301 March 8, 2006 Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation Motivation, as stated in the reader, “is a construct used to explain the initiation, direction, and intensity of an individual’s behavior,” (2001, pg. 171). In simpler terms, motivation explains why people do things. Intrinsic and extrinsic are two types of motivation, each providing a different explanation of why people engage in a task. Furthermore, the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation gives reason to why psychological compensation is important in an educational atmosphere as well as in a working environment. Intrinsic motivation is the process of feeling pleasure or satisfaction in which the rewards of an activity come from participation in the task rather than from the completion of the task (Beswick, 2002). A student that studies because learning fascinates him or her is a great example of intrinsic motivation. In addition, intrinsic reward is feeling proud, satisfied, or simply happy, after finishing a task. In other words, the enjoyment you feel from successful completion of an activity is intrinsic reward.
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