Analysis on My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun.docx...

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Running Head: SHAKESPEARE ANALYSIS 1 An Analysis of William Shakespeare: “My Mistress’ Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun” Montine Boyd Composition III South University Online Instructor John Phillips November 5, 2018
Running Head: MY MISTRESS’ EYES 2 An Analysis of William Shakespeare: “My Mistress’ Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun” Did you know the work of William Shakespeare has been used more often than any writing after the King James Bible (Goldstein, 2014)? Shakespeare’s poem, “My Mistress’ Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun,” was different than what was normally done during that era. This poem is also one of his most famous ones. In this poem, he describes how he sees his mistress. The way he describes his mistress to numerous beauties is never in a way to support her. The analysis will show what he sees when he looks at his lover. In the first line, Shakespeare is comparing his lover’s eyes to the sun. The sun is normally bright and full of life. In his description, the mistress’ eyes are the opposite, meaning her eye are dull and dim. This could mean that they are a dark color. In the second line, her lips are a metaphor to a coral. The coral is redder than her lips. “If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun,” has a word that is not used in everyday language (Shakespeare, 1690). Shakespeare is

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