08 OUMH1103 T4.pdf - Topic Information 4 Evaluation Criteria LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of this topic you should be able to 1 Identify five criteria

08 OUMH1103 T4.pdf - Topic Information 4 Evaluation...

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INTRODUCTION Are you aware that not all information in books, journal articles, conference papers or websites are relevant or suitable for your assignments and other coursework? Therefore, you will have to evaluate the information obtained from your search and select the one which you think is important for your assignments and further reading. The ideal stage for evaluating the materials retrieved should be at the point of reading them, following the criteria you set yourself, bearing in mind the topic at hand. The scope, range and depth of your presentation will depend on the evaluation and selection criteria that you have set for yourself. T T o o p p i i c c 4 4 Information Evaluation Criteria LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of this topic, you should be able to: 1. Identify five criteria for evaluating information; 2. Explain the importance of authority, and accuracy and reliability; 3. Describe the concept of objectivity, currency and scope; and 4. Select information using these five evaluation criteria. Copyright © Open University Malaysia (OUM)
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TOPIC 4 INFORMATION EVALUATION CRITERIA 157 There are five evaluation and selection criteria that you can use to evaluate and select the information that you have gathered. These criteria are authority, accuracy and reliability, objectivity, currency and scope. They are the focus of this fourth topic. Hopefully by the end of this topic, you will able to use them in completing your assignments and other coursework. AUTHORITY Firstly, what does authority mean? In the case of searching information for your assignment and other course works, authority refers to mastery in execution or performance, as of a work of art or literature or a piece of music (WordReference.com online dictionary, 2016). In terms of evaluating information for academic purposes, it is highly recommended that we use information from the experts with professional background. Therefore, ask yourself if the author (personal or corporate) is an authority on the subject. It would be best to look at the authorÊs credentials which can be found on the back page or on the jacket of the book. In the case of the Internet, authorship should be a major criterion. Here are some suggestions on what you need to do in the case of the Internet: (a) Check out who has placed the information on the Web. Look for the name of the author. Is there information on his professional background? (b) Check links from other documents for the authorÊs credentials and authority on the topic. (c) Examine the URL to get to the authority behind it, whether it is a personal Web directory or an organisationÊs official website. In the case of corporate authors, ask yourself if the corporation is directly responsible for the publication of the content. Be discerning and learn to distinguish between authoritative information and commercial information.
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