CHFD 220 Assignment 7.docx - Running head SEXUAL PREJUDICE \u201cDon\u2019t Ask Don\u2019t Tell\u201d CHFD220 Human Sexuality Dr Aaron Deris American Public

CHFD 220 Assignment 7.docx - Running head SEXUAL PREJUDICE...

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Running head: SEXUAL PREJUDICE “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” CHFD220: Human Sexuality Dr. Aaron Deris American Public University “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”
SEXUAL PREJUDICE Sexual prejudice discusses a person’s negative attitude concerning another person’s sexual preference, based on that person’s sexual orientation, whether the preference is homosexual, bisexual, or heterosexual. In many states, this prejudice includes one’s rights to do certain things. For example the right to insurance, adopting a child so they and their loved one can start a family and even marry their significant other. All of these rights are found acceptable for heterosexual couples (opposite sex relationships). These rights were found unacceptable by many in the 1990’s for same-sex couples. According to governing.com (2016), these are everyday rights that the “normal” everyday person took for granted for all those past years. Many people did not even know about the ethical restriction one had to endure simply by being homosexual (myself included). Since the year 1996, the approval and support rating for a marriage of same-sex couples has since then increased gradually. Back in March of 1996 only 27% of those surveyed believed that a marriage of this sort should be valid. By May 2009, that number had risen to 44% and by May of 2014 more than 55% of people surveyed believed that same-sex marriages should be valid. ("Marriage | Gallup Historical Trends," n.d.) To make even more impact on this in February of 2013 the Department of Defense announced that spouses of same-sex service members would be allowed the same benefits of other service members. ("Defense.gov Same Sex Benefits Memo," 2013) In a breakthrough governing issued on same-sex marriage back in June of 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court governed that the Constitution acknowledges for same-sex couples to marry, effectively overturning remaining restrictions in place in states. Previous to the ruling, 37 states and the District of Columbia had legalized same-sex marriage. All other 2

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