Choosing a Wound Dressing.pdf - Technical Guide HOW TO...

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HOW TO CHOOSE THE APPROPRIATE DRESSING FOR EACH WOUND TYPE Wound dressings are categorised in the Drug Tariff, which is administered and published by the Department of Health. The products are classified according to the properties of the dressing and there are usually several different types of dressings within a category. However, from a clinical perspective there is an easier way of classifying dressings into the following groups: 8 Film dressings 8 Simple island dressings 8 Non-adherent dressings 8 Moist dressings 8 Absorbent dressings. One of the roles of a tissue viability nurse is to examine the products available and together with other healthcare professionals, such as infection control nurses, pharmacists and procurement personnel, reach a decision regarding which of the different types of dressings will be used in their trust. Pauline Beldon is Tissue Viability Nurse Consultant for Epsom and St Helier Hospitals NHS Trust Choosing the right dressing to suit the conditions of a patient’s wound is vital for optimum healing and quality of life. This article examines the different types of wound dressing available, looks at the healing properties of each dressing and provides examples of the types of wounds that each dressing type should be used upon. Technical Guide That decision will be made following evaluation of the products to ensure they perform as well as the manufacturers claim. It is also crucial to ensure that the dressings meet the needs of patients and do not cause any unnecessary discomfort on application, while the dressing is being worn, or on removal. Antimicrobial dressings (those used to combat infection) should be selected by a tissue viability nurse or doctor, specifically to ensure the mode of action and treatment of infection is appropriate for the patient’s wound type. Film dressings These dressings can be used as primary or secondary dressings. Film dressings can also be used as a barrier to protect an area of the body that might be experiencing friction or shear forces, for example 140 Wound Essentials Volume 5 2010 Figure 1. A superficial heel ulcer resulting from friction/shear.
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142 Wound Essentials Volume 5 2010 Technical Guide a small superficial wound, producing minimal exudate or a superficial heel ulcer caused by friction or shear ( Figure 1 ). Examples of film dressings include: 8 Mepore Film ® (M ö lnlycke) 8 Askina ® Derm (B Braun) 8 Bioclusive (Systagenix Wound Management) 8 OpSite ® FlexiFix ® (Smith & Nephew) 8 Tegaderm Film (3M ). Simple island dressings Simple island dressings are only to be used over wounds closed by primary intention, in other words over a suture line. The dressings have a central pad of cellulose material to absorb any oozing from the suture line during the first 24 hours post-surgery.
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  • Summer '18
  • Thornton
  • Smith & Nephew, Tissue Viability Nurse Consultant

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