week 6 questions.docx - In what ways is the skin of...

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In what ways is the skin of children different from that of adults? 1. Largest organ of body 2. Thinner and fragile 3. Contain more water 4. Loosely attached to cells. 5. Low melatonin 6. Less sebaceous and eccrine sweat glands You have a teenage patient with terminal cancer who is refusing treatment. The parents instruct you to continue with the treatments despite the patient’s request. What is an appropriate response? - talk with parent and patient together and go through the processes - the teenager is a minor so the parents have the choice You are in the emergency room caring for a child with hip pain. List two factors that would push your differential diagnosis either towards Perthes disease or to a slipped capital femoral epiphysis. What is the classic presentation for these two diagnoses? - Perthes- in children ages 2-12. Males 4-8 o first 6-12 months asymptomatic o 1-4 years of intermittent limping, limited ROM, leg shortening, muscle wasting - Slipped capital femoral epiphysis o Prepuberty o Limping, leg externally rotated o Pain to hip or groin, thigh, knee o Limited mobility o Your patient is brought in by his parents, who state that the child is not as active as he was before, and that he has been using a strange maneuver to get from a lying to standing position. When asked, the parents admit that the child also has been slightly behind his peers in terms of mental development. What condition does this child have? o Duchenne How old is the child, approximately? o 3-4 years What gender is the child? How do we know that? o Male. X linked gene What is the prognosis for the next 9 years or so? For the rest of life? What kind of medical equipment might this child need, and how do we make sure that the equipment does not harm the child or caregiver?
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A parent brings in all of her children with similar complaints of itchy lesions to the webs of their fingers, palms, and wrists. What kind of lesions might you see? o Scabies o burrow How might the distribution of the lesions change based on age? What kind of treatment will the child receive? What kind of treatment will the family receive? If the first-line treatment does not work, what is the second-line medication? What are some ways to reduce itching? o Oral histamine o Permethrin lotion over entire body except face What kind of things must be washed, and in what way? For how long? o Daily changing of clothes and sheets, washed with hot water, ironed o 4 weeks afterwards, the patient is continuing to experience itchiness and a different kind of rash than the original lesions. What might be going on with this child?
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  • Summer '18
  • Human leg, Allergy

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