Essay 2 (ENGL 102).docx - Analysis of u201cThe Road Not...

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Analysis of “The Road Not Taken” Mark A. DeLeon Jr Liberty University Online APA
Thesis: In Robert Frosts “The Road Not Taken,” he uses symbolism to discuss the pressure of the decision-making process. He does so in a way that will allow the reader to choose the outcome based on their own perceived experiences. I. By using symbolism of a road in the form of an extended metaphor, Frost gives the reader a deeper sense of connection to the concept of choosing which path to take in life. A. “We miss the value of a symbol, however if we think it can mean absolutely anything we wish. If a poet has any control over our reaction, the poem will guide our responses in a certain direction.” (Kennedy and Gioia, 2016) B. Frost successfully allows the reader to choose which outcome taking either road produces by using open ended metaphors. II. Body A. The title “The Road Not Taken” symbolizes the journey of life. As Frost goes through the decision-making process he looks at the actual roads he is describing while speaking figuratively about both paths. 1. “And be one traveler, long I stood” (Frost, 1916). He reflects on the importance of making this decision. It is not something he flippantly chooses but a choice he must make. Interestingly, he accomplishes this while not giving either path a right or wrong, a better or worse. 2. “And looked down one as far as I could” (Frost, 1916) while making his choice, he is again using this metaphor of trying to see into the future. As is true in real life, he can only see so far before there are obstacles before him preventing him from seeing any further. By describing the bend in the road disappearing into
the growth he uses the symbolism of the path to show how any decision-making process, eventually comes to a stall, where you need to choose and move forward to see the next phase. 3. Frost calls the choice “fair” allowing the reader to take an optimistic or pessimistic view based on the readers own interpretation. B. Frost makes the sudden decision, he “Then took the other, as just as fair,” while using the word “perhaps” again leaving the reader to interpret if it is the better or worse choice, until the close of the second stanza where he refers to both paths as “worn them really about the same,” 1.

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