w3-9.docx - The inflammation in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is called acute rhinosinusitis(ARS The most common etiology of ARS is viral

w3-9.docx - The inflammation in the nasal cavity and...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 3 pages.

The inflammation in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is called acute rhinosinusitis (ARS). The most common etiology of ARS is viral infections associated with common cold. Differentiating bacterial ARS with viral ARS is challenging as both present with similar manifestation. Less than 2% is associated with bacterial infections. The most common pathogens in adults with acute bacterial sinusitis are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis,and Staphylococcus aureus (Rosenfeld, 2016). Is there any additional subjective or objective information you need for this client? Explain. Although most episodes of acute sinusitis are caused by viral upper respiratory tract infections, they are also associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis, smoking, and exposure to secondhand smoke. Since an accurate diagnosis of acute sinusitis is important for planning treatment regimen, a thorough history and physical is necessary. During the health assessment, in addition to the information provided, I will collect this patient’s smoking and other tobacco use history, over the counter and complementary medication review, allergies, history and recurrence of present symptoms, and a detailed physical assessment. Acute sinusitis symptoms present with up to 4 weeks of purulent anterior or posterior nasal drainage accompanied by nasal obstruction; facial pain, pressure, or fullness; or both (Rosenfeld, 2016). Assessment of the onset and progression of symptoms is important as usually viral upper respiratory symptoms generally peak rapidly, decline by the third day of illness, and end after 1 week, although in 25% of patients the symptoms last longer but decrease. In contrast, acute bacterial sinusitis persists for 10 days or longer without improvement, manifests with worsening of symptoms in the first 10 days after initial improvement, in a double-worsening pattern (Rosenfeld, 2016). I will perform a neuro exam to rule out meningitis. Physical
Image of page 1
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 3 pages?

  • Spring '19
  • Sonya B.
  • Sinusitis, Upper respiratory tract infection, Chronic sinusitis

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture