jnnnnnn.pdf - RE SH A NO T Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals US E ON LY \u2014 DO 15.b AL Worldwide Education Services RN 1133 Innovation Way Sunnyvale

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Unformatted text preview: RE SH A NO T Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals US E ON LY — DO 15.b AL Worldwide Education Services RN 1133 Innovation Way Sunnyvale, CA 94089 USA 408-745-2000 IN TE Course Number: EDU-JUN-JNDF Student Guide Volume 1 of 2 RE This document is produced by Juniper Networks, Inc. This document or any part thereof may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form under penalty of law, without the prior written permission of Juniper Networks Education Services. SH A Juniper Networks, Junos, Steel-Belted Radius, NetScreen, and ScreenOS are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. in the United States and other countries. The Juniper Networks Logo, the Junos logo, and JunosE are trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. All other trademarks, service marks, registered trademarks, or registered service marks are the property of their respective owners. Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Student Guide, Revision 15.b Copyright © 2015 Juniper Networks, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in USA. Revision History: Revision 15.a—March 2015. Revision 15.b—June 2015. NO T The information in this document is current as of the date listed above. DO The information in this document has been carefully verified and is believed to be accurate. Juniper Networks assumes no responsibilities for any inaccuracies that may appear in this document. In no event will Juniper Networks be liable for direct, indirect, special, exemplary, incidental, or consequential damages resulting from any defect or omission in this document, even if advised of the possibility of such damages. Juniper Networks reserves the right to change, modify, transfer, or otherwise revise this publication without notice. YEAR 2000 NOTICE — Juniper Networks hardware and software products do not suffer from Year 2000 problems and hence are Year 2000 compliant. The Junos operating system has no known time-related limitations through the year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036. SOFTWARE LICENSE IN TE RN AL US E ON LY The terms and conditions for using Juniper Networks software are described in the software license provided with the software, or to the extent applicable, in an agreement executed between you and Juniper Networks, or Juniper Networks agent. By using Juniper Networks software, you indicate that you understand and agree to be bound by its license terms and conditions. Generally speaking, the software license restricts the manner in which you are permitted to use the Juniper Networks software, may contain prohibitions against certain uses, and may state conditions under which the license is automatically terminated. You should consult the software license for further details. SH A RE Contents Chapter 1: Course Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Chapter 2: Network Design Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 NO T A Need for Network Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Knowledge Is King . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 A Proposed Design Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20 A Reference Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23 Chapter 3: Understanding Customer Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 DO RFP Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 Scoping the Design Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12 Analyzing the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19 Lab: Understanding Customer Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25 Chapter 4: Organizing the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 LY — Processing the Data and Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 Identifying Boundaries and Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12 Design Proposal Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19 Chapter 5: Securing the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 ON Why Secure the Network? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3 Security Design Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9 Chapter 6: Creating the Design—Campus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 US E The Campus Network: An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 Best Practices and Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10 Architectural Design Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-29 Lab: Creating the Design—Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-41 Chapter 7: Creating the Design—WAN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1 AL The WAN: An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3 Best Practices and Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10 WAN Design Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-30 Lab: Creating the Design—WAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-38 RN Chapter 8: Creating the Design—Data Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 IN TE The Data Center: An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3 Best Practices and Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7 Data Center Design Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-31 Lab: Creating the Design—Data Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-44 Contents • iii RE Chapter 9: Business Continuity and Network Enhancements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 SH A Business Continuity Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3 High Availability Design Considerations and Best Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10 High Availability Offerings and Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18 IN TE RN AL US E ON LY — DO NO T Acronym List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACR-1 iv • Contents RE Course Overview SH A This three-day course is designed to cover introductory best practices, theory, and design principles for overall network design and will serve as the prerequisite course for other design subject areas — data center, security, and WAN. Objectives After successfully completing this course, you should be able to: Provide an overview of network design needs and common business requirements. • Describe key product groups related to campus, WAN, data center, and security architectures. • Analyze and interpret common RFP requirements. • Scope a network design by gathering data and working with key stakeholders. • Describe ways of processing customer data and design requests. • Identify boundaries and scope for the design proposal. • List common considerations when creating a design proposal. • Provide an overview of network security design and common vulnerabilities. • List high-level design considerations and best practices for securing the network. • List the components of the campus network design. • Describe best practices and design considerations for the campus. • Describe architectural design options for the campus. • List the components of the WAN. • Describe best practices and design considerations for the WAN. • Describe design options for the WAN. • List the components of the data center design. • Describe best practices and design considerations for the data center. • Describe architectural design options for the data center. • Define business continuity and its importance in network design. • Describe high availability design considerations and best practices. • Provide an overview of high availability offerings and solutions. • Describe class of service (CoS) design considerations. • Provide an overview of environmental considerations in network design. • List design considerations and best practices for managing the network. • Provide an overview of Juniper Networks and third party options for network management. • DO — LY ON E US List design considerations and best practices for network automation. Provide an overview of automation tools. Explain the foundational topics that have been taught throughout the course. RN • AL • NO T • Create a network design proposal that satisfies customer requirements and business needs. • Provide an overview of the steps involved in migrating a network. • Describe best practices used in network migration. • List the various campus network topographies. • Describe sample design options for the campus. IN TE • Course Overview • v RE Intended Audience This course is targeted for Juniper Networks system engineers, partner sales engineers (including Champions), and services partners who are interested in learning network design introductory concepts. However, the course is also applicable to a general audience of Juniper customers with a desire to learn more about network design. SH A Course Level Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals is an associate-level course. Prerequisites Understanding of the OSI model and TCP/IP; • Knowledge of routing architectures and protocols; • Knowledge of switching architectures and protocols; • Knowledge of Juniper Networks products and solutions; • Understanding of infrastructure security principles; and • Basic knowledge of hypervisors and load balancers. IN TE RN AL US E ON LY — DO • NO T The prerequisites for this course are as follows: vi • Course Overview RE Course Agenda Day 1 SH A Chapter 1: Course Introduction Chapter 2: Network Design Fundamentals Chapter 3: Understanding Customer Requirements Lab: Understanding Customer Requirements Chapter 4: Organizing the Data NO T Chapter 5: Securing the Network Day 2 Chapter 6: Creating the Design—Campus Lab: Creating the Design—Campus Chapter 7: Creating the Design—WAN DO Lab: Creating the Design—WAN Chapter 8: Creating the Design—Data Center Lab: Creating the Design—Data Center — Chapter 9: Business Continuity and Network Enhancements Day 3 Chapter 11: Automation Lab: Enhancing the Design LY Chapter 10: Network Management Lab: Final Project ON Chapter 12: Putting Network Design into Practice Appendix A: Network Migration Strategies Appendix B: Sample Campus Designs IN TE RN AL US E Appendix C: Sample Response to RFP Course Agenda • vii RE Document Conventions CLI and GUI Text SH A Frequently throughout this course, we refer to text that appears in a command-line interface (CLI) or a graphical user interface (GUI). To make the language of these documents easier to read, we distinguish GUI and CLI text from standard text according to the following table. Description Usage Example Franklin Gothic Normal text. Most of what you read in the Lab Guide and Student Guide. Courier New Console text: NO T Style • Screen captures commit complete • Noncommand-related syntax Exiting configuration mode GUI text elements: • Menu names DO Select File > Open, and then click Configuration.conf in the Filename text box. • Text field entry Input Text Versus Output Text — You will also frequently see cases where you must enter input text yourself. Often these instances will be shown in the context of where you must enter them. We use bold style to distinguish text that is input versus text that is simply displayed. Description Normal CLI No distinguishing variant. LY Style ON Normal GUI Text that you must enter. CLI Input Physical interface:fxp0, Enabled View configuration history by clicking Configuration > History. [email protected]_Jose> show route Select File > Save, and type config.ini in the Filename field. E GUI Input Usage Example US Defined and Undefined Syntax Variables Finally, this course distinguishes between regular text and syntax variables, and it also distinguishes between syntax variables where the value is already assigned (defined variables) and syntax variables where you must assign the value (undefined variables). Note that these styles can be combined with the input style as well. Description AL Style CLI Variable GUI Variable RN CLI Undefined IN TE GUI Undefined viii • Document Conventions Usage Example Text where variable value is already assigned. policy my-peers Text where the variable’s value is the user’s discretion or text where the variable’s value as shown in the lab guide might differ from the value the user must input according to the lab topology. Type set policy policy-name. Click my-peers in the dialog. ping 10.0.x.y Select File > Save, and type filename in the Filename field. RE Additional Information Education Services Offerings SH A You can obtain information on the latest Education Services offerings, course dates, and class locations from the World Wide Web by pointing your Web browser to: . About This Publication The Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Student Guide is written and maintained by the Juniper Networks Education Services development team. Please send questions and suggestions for improvement to [email protected] NO T Technical Publications You can print technical manuals and release notes directly from the Internet in a variety of formats: • Go to . • Locate the specific software or hardware release and title you need, and choose the format in which you want to view or print the document. Documentation sets and CDs are available through your local Juniper Networks sales office or account representative. DO Juniper Networks Support IN TE RN AL US E ON LY — For technical support, contact Juniper Networks at , or at 1-888-314-JTAC (within the United States) or 408-745-2121 (outside the United States). Additional Information • ix RE SH A NO T DO — LY ON E US AL RN TE IN x • Additional Information RE SH A NO T Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals IN TE RN AL US E ON LY — DO Chapter 1: Course Introduction ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals We Will Discuss: Objectives and course content information; • Additional Juniper Networks, Inc. courses; and • The Juniper Networks Certification Program. IN TE RN AL US E • Chapter 1–2 • Course Introduction ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Introductions IN TE RN AL US E The slide asks several questions for you to answer during class introductions. Course Introduction • Chapter 1–3 ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Course Contents: Part 1 IN TE RN AL US E The slide lists the topics we discuss in this course. Chapter 1–4 • Course Introduction ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Course Contents: Part 2 IN TE RN AL US E The slide lists the remainder of the topics we discuss in this course. Course Introduction • Chapter 1–5 ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Prerequisites IN TE RN AL US E The slide lists the prerequisites for this course. Chapter 1–6 • Course Introduction General Course Administration ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals IN TE RN AL US E The slide documents general aspects of classroom administration. Course Introduction • Chapter 1–7 ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Training and Study Materials IN TE RN AL US E The slide describes Education Services materials that are available for reference both in the classroom and online. Chapter 1–8 • Course Introduction ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Additional Resources IN TE RN AL US E The slide provides links to additional resources available to assist you in the installation, configuration, and operation of Juniper Networks products. Course Introduction • Chapter 1–9 ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Satisfaction Feedback US E Juniper Networks uses an electronic survey system to collect and analyze your comments and feedback. Depending on the class you are taking, please complete the survey at the end of the class, or be sure to look for an e-mail about two weeks from class completion that directs you to complete an online survey form. (Be sure to provide us with your current e-mail address.) IN TE RN AL Submitting your feedback entitles you to a certificate of class completion. We thank you in advance for taking the time to help us improve our educational offerings. Chapter 1–10 • Course Introduction ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Juniper Networks Education Services Curriculum US E Juniper Networks Education Services can help ensure that you have the knowledge and skills to deploy and maintain cost-effective, high-performance networks for both enterprise and service provider environments. We have expert training staff with deep technical and industry knowledge, providing you with instructor-led hands-on courses in the classroom and online, as well as convenient, self-paced eLearning courses. Courses IN TE RN AL You can access the latest Education Services offerings covering a wide range of platforms at . Course Introduction • Chapter 1–11 ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Juniper Networks Certification Program IN TE RN AL US E A Juniper Networks certification is the benchmark of skills and competence on Juniper Networks technologies. Chapter 1–12 • Course Introduction ON LY — DO NO T SH A RE Juniper Networks Design Fundamentals Juniper Networks Certification Program Overview US E The Juniper Networks Certification Program (JNCP) consists of platform-specific, multitiered tracks that enable participants to demonstrate competence with Juniper Networks technology through a combination of written proficiency exams and hands-on configuration and troubleshooting exams. Successful candidates demonstrate a thorough understanding of Internet and security technologies and Juniper Networks platform configuration and troubleshooting skills. The JNCP offers the fo...
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