TechnicalGuidelinesforUtilizationofDownedCoconutsandTrees.doc - FOOD AND AGRICUTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS INTERIM TECHNICAL GUIDANCE ON

TechnicalGuidelinesforUtilizationofDownedCoconutsandTrees.doc

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FOOD AND AGRICUTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS INTERIM TECHNICAL GUIDANCE ON SALVAGE AND USE OF DOWNED COCONUTS AND TREES - TYPHOON HAIYAN/YOLANDA Purpose The Philippines Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) ( ) has overall responsibility for managing the country’s environment and natural resources. Within DENR, the Forest Management Bureau (FMB - ) is responsible for providing support to the effective protection, development, management and conservation of forestlands, forest resources and watersheds. The Department of Agriculture (DA) ( ) and the Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA) ( ) have responsibility for monitoring and supporting the production aspects of coconuts and development of the coconut industry in the country. This interim guidance is aimed at providing basic principles and information to individuals and organizations providing support for the salvaging and utilization of coconuts and trees blown down by Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda, consistent with the country’s relevant legislation, regulations and policies. Background The extremely high winds of Typhoon Yolanda resulted in millions of downed coconuts and other trees throughout Regions VIII, VII, VI, and IVB. The most common windblown species was coconut – due to the species’ relatively weak and shallow rooting structure – but individual trees of virtually all forest and farm species were uprooted by the powerful winds. Initial reports from the Philippine Coconut Authority indicate that more than 33 million coconut trees in the seven provinces along the main path of Typhoon Yolanda (Quezon, Guimaras, Iloilo, Negros Occidental, Cebu, Eastern Samar and Leyte) were damaged to varying degrees. Approximately 15 million trees were totally destroyed. The abundant volume of downed coconuts and fruit and timber trees provides vast volumes of woody biomass potentially available for reconstruction. Initial efforts have been made by the Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA), the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) and other agencies and organizations to utilize downed coconuts and trees in an efficient and timely manner. Policy and Legal Context Republic Act 10593 (revision of RA 8084 “Coconut Preservation Act”) regulates the cutting of standing coconuts, requiring permits issued by the Philippine Coconut Authority. No restrictions exist in the instance of coconuts destroyed or downed, as in the case with typhoon-blown coconuts. Regulations governing the cutting and use of timber trees in the Philippines are complex. Executive Order No. 23, series of 2011, declared a moratorium on the cutting and harvesting of all timber in the natural and residual forests of the entire country. Cutting of timber and fruit trees planted on private lands – provided the trees have been duly registered and certified by the relevant Community Environment and Natural Resources Officer (CENRO) – is allowed, but permits are required to transport the cut trees.
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