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Unformatted text preview: Debate Over Democracy Treaty of Paris, 1783 Articles of Confederation Alexander Hamilton Virginia Plan Great Compromise I. Articles of Confederation II. Federalists v. Anti-Federalists III. Constitutional Convention IV. Great Compromise Treaty of Paris: Territorial Limits of New Nation: West to the Mississippi River, North to Great Lakes, South to Northern boundary of Florida Competition in North America: New U.S. east of Mississippi River. Great Britain in Canada, Spain in Florida and west of the Mississippi River, Spain Secretly cedes western Territory to France in 1800 Delegates Draft the Articles of Confederation shortly after the Declaration of Independence was made. The Articles of Confed. becomes the First Government of the United States Gov. has authority to declare war, Foreign affairs, state boundary disputes, post office, Native Americans that didn’t live in state boundary Gov. cannot collect taxes only can ask for contributions. Cannot force Military service only could as for volunteers. Articles of Confederation required every state to approve it. If you needed to make any changes to the document that also required full approval. In 1781, ratification of the Articles of Confederation happens. Mid 1780 2 different political parties occurred. Federalists and the Anti-Federalists. Federalists: George Washington, James Madison. Both believe in a strong central government. Often worried about the common people having too much voice. Wanted the wealthy and educated to have political voice. Anti-Federalists: Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams. Worried that power would corrupt. Believed that power should reside at the local level. The people at the local level know what they need in their society. Anti-federalist wanted a weak central government and wanted the power in the hands of the state. Political leaders hold a convention in spring 1787 and they realize the Artic. Of Confed. couldn’t be fixed and they start to write up a new type of government. This convention is called the Constitutional convention in may 1787 in Philadelphia. The Constitutional convention was behind closed doors. No outsiders would be allowed to enter and no outsiders would be allowed to know what was happening behind closed doors. Alexander Hamilton- leader of the Federalists. Put his views on the wealthy wanted them to build the economy with the rich boost the business. Believed the wealthy should lead the government to great success and the poor should have no say in the Government. Alexander Hamilton gives a 2 hour long speech outlining his government where: Congress- Elected for life, President- Elected for life, The Virginia plan: Lower House- Elected by the people Upper House (Senate)- Chosen by Lower House, President- Named by Congress, The National Judiciary and Council of Revision will both be involved in evaluating the laws to determine fairness and if its just Benjamin Franklin and a couple other delegates and they negotiated a compromise called The Great Compromise. They begin to draft the new government called the Constitution. Constitution: Lower House (House of Representatives)- Population Based Upper House (Senate)- Equal Representation President- Chosen by the Electoral College Supreme Court- President appoints, senate confirms Support for the constitution was from the Atlantic world economy Those away from international trade they despised the constitution They decided that slaves counted as 3/5th of a person (3/5th compromise) Delegates also agreed to leave slave trade open for at least another 20 years Fugitive slave law- if you were a slave in one state if you escaped that state and made it to a free state this would not change your status you were still a slave. ...
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