PHI210 Week 3_ Marcum Jr_Assignment.docx - 1 John Doe Week 3 Assignment Roger D Marcum Jr Week 3 Assignment Independence University The Voting right for

PHI210 Week 3_ Marcum Jr_Assignment.docx - 1 John Doe Week...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 13 pages.

John Doe Week 3 Assignment Roger D. Marcum Jr Week 3 Assignment Independence University The Voting right for felons True premise: You can lose your right to vote. True premise: The right of citizens of the United States is who are eighteen years of age or older, can vote and shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age. One of the question’s that we have about voting are, should felons be allowed to vote? The other question is what does the US Constitution say about voting and punishment? I will go through some areas that I found interesting and tell you the conclusion that I have found, I hope you like this paper so let’s get started, the first one I’m going to go over is, should felons be a loud to vote? What is your opinion on this subject? Pro1: Over the past decades the states that are across the country have made significant scaling back archaic laws that collectively deny voting to millions of Americans with criminal convictions in their past. Florida is not one of the states that will let the convicted people vote. The state has a 150-year-old-law that bans people from voting for life if they have a conviction. Imagine for a second if nearly every adult citizen living in Miami-Dade County lost their right to vote. This is a reality in Florida, according to estimates from the Sentencing Project, nearly 1.5 1
Image of page 1
John Doe Week 3 Assignment million of convicted citizens have permanently lost their right to vote. Most of these people have fully completed their sentences and are out of trouble with the law (Akasha, 2017). The voters really should consider the importance of the second chance, for someone who has committed a crime, in their past and is now a part of the community, and is trying to support themselves, and their families just like everyone else. It is very hard to do this without a voice in our government and future employment (Akasha, 2017). Con1: Its make’s perfect sense to take away certain rights from felons, at least until they have served their sentences in full, and then shown they have turned over a new leaf by not committing a new crime (Clegg, 2017). We don’t let felons vote, because there are certain minimum objective standards of responsibility, trustworthiness, and commitment to our laws that are required of the people before they can be entrusted with the role in solemn enterprise of self- government. Children, noncitizen, the mentally incompetent, and those who have committed a serious crime against their fellow citizens don’t meet the standards (Clegg, 2017). Pro2: President Barack Obama on Thursday July 14, 2015 said “I will be the first sitting President to visit a federal prison, and I’m going to shine a spotlight on this issue because while the people in our prisons have made some mistakes, and sometimes big mistakes, they are also Americans, and we have to make sure that they do their time and pay back their dept to society, and that we increasing the possibility that they can turn their lives around. If folks have served their time, and they’ve reentered society, they should be able to vote” (Obama, 2015). Across the
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 13 pages?

  • Summer '18
  • Philosophy, President of the United States, The Star-Spangled Banner, national anthem

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture