Week 3 - Reformulating the Gazi Narrative.PDF - Linda T...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 41 pages.

Linda  T. DARLING  13  REFORMULATING  THE  GAZI  NARRATIVE:  WHEN  WAS  THE  OTTOMAN  STATE  GAZi STATE?  "0  nion  or  garlic?"  was  how  Cemal  Kafadar  posed  the  problem  of  the  nature  of  the  early  Ottoman  state. Was  it  the  product  of  a  single  impulse  whose  nature  can  be  discovered  if  we  peel away  enough  layers,  or  was  it  formed  from  competing impUlses, all  of  which  left  traces  in  the  sources?  Lacking  definitive  contemporary  information, scholars  have  debated  the  true nature  of  early  Ottoman  identity,  and  particularly the  definition  and  role  of  gaza  in  it,  for  some  time  without closure.  It  is  not  enough  to  protest  that  we  can  no  longer  regard  the  early Ottomans as  zealous warriors  for  the  faith  whose  purpose  was  to  offer  to  the' infidel  Islam  or  the  sword.  the  stereotypes,  we  also  need  new  nar- rative  of  early  Ottoman  history,  one  that  although tentative  can  be  used  not  just  as a springboard  by  specialists  but  also as a framework  for  teach- ing  and  textbooks.  Linda  T.  DARLING,  Associate  Professor,  The  University  of  Arizona,  Department  of  History,  Social  Sciences  215,  1145  E.  South  Campus  Drive,  Tucson,  AZ  85721,  United  States  of  America.  [email protected]  C.  KAFADAR,  Between Two Worlds: the Construction  of  the Ottoman State,  Berkeley,  University  of  California Press, 1995,  p.  90.:  An  earlier  version  of  the  present  paper  was  presented  at  the  New  England  Medieval  Conference,  "Crusade,  Jihad  and  Identity  in  the  Medieval  Mediterranean  World,"  Dartmouth  College,  Hanover.NH,  Oct.  3-4,2008.  The  paper  pays  tribute  to  the  work  of  Keith  Hopwood,  historian  of  pre- and  early  Ottoman  Anatolia,  who  died  suddenly  in  early 2008.  Turcica,  43,  2011,  p. 13-53.  doi:  10.2143{11JRC.43.0.2174063  ©   2011 Turcica. Tous droits reserves. 
14  LINDA T. DARLING  The  historical narrative told at  the  beginning  of  most  textbooks  on  Ottoman history identifies the Ottomans as  gazis  from the start: Tiirkmen  tribesmen  come  down  from  the hills,  motivated  by  gaza   (and  more  recently popUlation pressure), to raid  and  then  to conquer the unprotected  remnants  of  Christian Byzantium, fIrst  in  Asia  Minor  and  then  in  the  Balkans. Although challenged as  early as  1929  by  Hasluck's  work  on  syncretism,  so  far  this narrative has  not  been  replaced;  Beldiceanu∙  in  Histoire  de  ['empire  ottoman  merely  reports A§Ikpll§azade's  story  of  Ottoman beginnings, and even  Finkel's  Osman's 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture