Chapter 17 Notes Outline Kayla Hudson.docx - Chapter 17...

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Chapter 17 Notes/Outline: The Road to WarPart 1: The Wilmot ProvisoSubheadingMain IdeasSupporting DetailsThe Wilmot Proviso:Wilmot suggested that each new stretch of territory the united states obtained from Mexico would be made free from slavery. “Wilmot had other plans. His amendment, soon dubbed the Wilmot Proviso, was simple. He proposed that slavery be banned in whatever territories the United States acquired from Mexico.”Pg. 392 Part 2: The North’s Critique of the SouthThe North’s Critique of the South:Many anti slavery writers said that slavery was an evil deed and putting a man into a slavery takes away the potential that hemay have become.“Most northerners did not care one way or another about the plight of black slaves. But they came to see slavery as evil because, in the words of one critic, “slavery withers and blights all it touches.” To prevent this moral and economic blight from spreading, northerners were determined to confine slavery to the areas where it already existed.”Pg. 393Part 3: The South’s Critique of the NorthThe South’s Critique of the North: The south were sickened by the pleas from the North. They said that a free society with free blacks was disgusting.““Free Society!” cried a southern newspaper.“We sicken at the name. What is it but a conglomeration of greasy mechanics, filthy operatives…and small farmers who do their own drudgery, and yet are hardly fit for association with a Southern gentleman’s body servant?””Pg. 394
Part 4: The Compromise of 1850SubheadingMain IdeasSupporting DetailsThe Compromise of 1850:The conflict between the north and the south began to grow so great that they eventually formed a compromise to aid in the chaos. “With tensions running high, Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky stepped in to mediate the crisis. Clay no longer resembled the young man who had guided the Missouri Compromise through the Senate. He was in failing health, his face more gaunt and worn than ever. But he was still strong of mind andspirit, and more determined than ever to preserve the Union. “War and dissolution of the Union are identical and inevitable,” he warned his colleagues on both sides of the divide. The only way out was to compromise.”Pg. 395 Part 5: The Winds of Political ChangeThe Winds of Political Change:Many old disagreements were settled as time went on but newarguments arose amongst the conflict between the north and the sound.“But by the late 1840s, many of the old disagreements were settled. Andrew Jacksonhad killed the national bank, and few people

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