background sublimilal message.pdf - Subliminal Advertising...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 16 pages.

Subliminal Advertising and the Perpetual Popularity of Playing to People's Paranoia Author(s): SHERI J. BROYLES Source: The Journal of Consumer Affairs, Vol. 40, No. 2 (Winter 2006), pp. 392-406 Published by: Wiley Stable URL: Accessed: 20-12-2018 10:07 UTC JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at Wiley is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The Journal of Consumer Affairs This content downloaded from 41.33.250.18 on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 10:07:59 UTC All use subject to
392 THE JOURNAL OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS SHERI J. BROYLES Subliminal Advertising and the Perpetual Popularity of Playing to People's Paranoia Every 20 years, subliminal advertising pops back into popular culture. August Bullock (2004a) is the most recent "advocate* with his book The Secret Sales Pitch: An Overview of Subliminal Advertising. This paper reviews nearly SO years of research on subliminal advertising and com ments specifically about Bullock's more recent publication. The liter ature repeatedly shows that most effects are only obtained in highly artificial situations, and no research has shown an effect that changed attitudes or impacted purchasing behavior. What is commonly thought of today as subliminal advertising bega 1957 when a movie theater experiment subliminally directed the aud to "eat popcorn" and "drink Coca-Cola." David Ogilvy, founder of international advertising agency Ogilvy & Mather, noted that "[unf nately word of [this] found its way into the public prints, and provided g for the mills of the anti-advertising brigade" (Ogilvy 1983, 209). In a movie theater in Fort Lee, NJ, psychologist and market researcher James M. Vicary claimed to have conducted a six-week st in 1957 that involved showing movies while at the same time projecting th words "eat popcorn" and "drink Coca-Cola" on the screen for 1/3,00 a second. The claimed results of increased sales of popcorn and cola widely reported in numerous news media stories. Though the study never reported in a scientific journal and had no control group, it fit ular paranoia of media power such that it caused a public outcry concernin psychological manipulation of consumers, which was immediate and w spread (Moore 1982). When a major research company and severa demic researchers failed to replicate the original results, Vi eventually admitted that he had invented his experiment's results in effort to revive his then-failing research firm (Gray 2000; Rogers 19 1993; Rotfeld 2001). His admission was widely covered in the trade p of the period, yet despite the "experiment" and results having been Sheri J. Broy les is an associate professor of advertising at the Department of Journalism and May

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture