M003_ArduinoIntroduction.SP19.v1.pdf - Module 003...

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Introduction to the Arduino/RedBoard Module 003: Introduction to the Arduino/RedBoard Module Outline In this module you will be introduced to the microcontroller . To do this lab, you will need to purchase either an Arduino Uno (or other Arduino board) or a clone like that manufactured by Sparkfun called the RedBoard PLUS the appropriate cable. A “clone” behaves identically to the popular Arduino Uno. All of the inputs and outputs have the same function, the inputs and outputs behave electrically the same and it is programmed in the same way. You may also use another model (like the Arduino Mega, but the figures will differ from that of the Uno). Arduino Hardware The figure below shows a visual comparison of the Arduino Uno to the Sparkfun RedBoard. Price is often the reason for choosing a clone over the original, but the Arduinos are typically made of better parts and the microprocessor is in a socket so it can be removed for embedded applications. An in-depth comparison is found at the Sparkfun webpage . Figure 1: Arduino Uno compared to Sparkfun’s RedBoard
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Introduction to the Arduino/Reboard Notes: On the right is a figure provided by SparkFun to highlight critical parts of the board. Hardware Interface Pins to External Circuitry Digital Pins Pins that can be configured as inputs or outputs. Digital means that the voltage measured can only have two values 0V or 5V. Some of the pins have PWM functionality described later. Analog Pins Pins that input a continuous voltage that the onboard processor digitizes which means that the voltage range 0-5V is mapped onto integer values of 0-1023. Power Pins Pins that can be used to power the Arduino board and can source a regulated 3.3V and 5V. Several GND pins are provided. Useful Board Features Reset Button This button interrupts the program running on the board and restarts it from the beginning. USB Connector This is a mini USB port that is used to connect the board to a USB port on a computer. This is the interface by which the programs loaded into the microcontroller are downloaded. Power is also provided through this port. Pin 13 LED An LED that is always connected to pin 13. If this LED is on then the voltage at pin 13 is 5V if it is off the voltage is 0V. This a useful debugging feature. Serial LEDs The serial LEDs indicate the traffic on the receive and transmit pins. The computer and many other devices communicate to the board serially. As you upload programs to the board or communicate to the serial port using coded statements you can see the traffic as these pins flicker when data is being transmitted and received. Barrel or Jack Connector This jack is used to connect a battery to provide power to the board so that the board can be disconnected from the computer.
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